Olney: realign the Rays out of the AL East

Leave a comment

Buster uses the Mauer signing as a jumping off point for thoughts on the
A’s and Rays.  For the A’s: Bud needs to make San Jose happen.  No
argument there. My view is that the commish should offer the Giants some
concessions, deem the move to be OK, and make the Giants sue if they
don’t like it. The Giants may be rattling their sword, but they have a
large and disparate ownership group full of businessmen who didn’t get
rich by spending years in litigation.  If Peter Angelos — a man who did
get rich by spending years in litigation — didn’t sue, the Giants
won’t either.

Buster’s take on the Rays is a bit more problematic:

Selig has the power to affect change on behalf of the Rays, too, through
realignment. He needs to get Tampa Bay out of the AL East, to give the
Rays a consistent opportunity for success. This, in time, will give them
a chance to build their brand and make their case for a new ballpark.

There’s been a lot of realignment chatter lately, but someone has to
play in the AL East, don’t they?  And though I realize that the past
decade or so seems like forever, I remain convinced that the current
Yankees-Red Sox hegemony is a temporary phenomenon. Sure, they’ll always
have financial advantages, but the competitive advantages that flow
from them aren’t always going to be this pronounced.

The Jeter-Rivera-Poada-Pettitte isn’t something you can just buy, and it
isn’t something that appears by happenstance, even among the
smartest-drafting team. If the Yankees merely had the dollars or merely
had the core and didn’t have the other, we’d be in a very different
world than we’ve experienced since 1995. It’s a team that didn’t even
make the playoffs in 2008.  I’m not entirely certain the Red Sox will
make the playoffs this year, but I’ll save that for my big predictions
post next week. Anyway, I’ll grant that life sucks for the poorer sisters of the AL East
now, but I am convinced that it won’t suck forever and that making
realignment decisions based on temporary dominance would be a
shortsighted move.

But if we’re going to realign — and Bud says he thinks about it — let’s just go whole-hog with it and make a system that will never be subject to these little eddies of competitive frustration in the baseball-time continuum: two leagues, no divisions, top four teams in each league make the playoffs. If you don’t like that all the action will be in the race for the 3-4 slot as opposed at the top, build in pronounced home field advantage for the top finishers.

Or let’s just leave it as it is and see what happens over the next few years.

Casey McGehee signs one-year deal with Yomiuri Giants

DETROIT, MI - AUGUST 19: Casey McGehee #31 of the Detroit Tigers singles in the fourth inning of the game against the Boston Red Sox on August 19, 2016 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

Former Tigers infielder Casey McGehee has reportedly signed a one-year deal with the Yomiuri Giants of Nippon Professional Baseball, according to FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal.

It’s the fourth move the corner infielder has made in the last two seasons after seeing short-term stints with the Marlins, Giants and Tigers. He signed a minor league deal with the Tigers prior to the 2016 season, providing the club with some infield depth behind 24-year-old Nick Castellanos. When Castellanos hit the disabled list in August with a broken hand, McGehee was recalled from Triple-A Toledo for a 30-game stint and slashed .228/.260/.239 with one extra-base hit in 96 PA. His career batting line (.258/.317/.384 over eight seasons) isn’t too shabby, but his age and a long history of knee injuries puts a damper on his potential.

McGehee last appeared in the NPB circuit in 2013, when he signed a one-year, $1.5 million deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles. He spent the bulk of his season at the hot corner, batting an impressive .292/.396/.515 with 28 homers in 590 PA and appearing in the Eagles’ first and only championship run to date.

The deal comes with a club option for 2018, Rosenthal reports, though no figure has been specified.

Report: Dodgers could pursue three-year deal with Rich Hill

LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 18:  Rich Hill #44 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches in the first inning against the Chicago Cubs in game three of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium on October 18, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Getty Images
2 Comments

Free agent left-hander Rich Hill is rumored to be entertaining a three-year, $40+ million offer from the Dodgers, reports Peter Gammons. The Boston Globe’s Nick Cafardo corroborated the report, adding that Hill could receive somewhere between $46 and $48 million from his former team.

Hill, 36, pitched to a 2.12 ERA and 3.91 FIP in back-to-back stints with the Athletics and Dodgers in 2016. While a chronic case of blisters on his pitching hand limited the frequency of his starts, he still figures to be one of the most productive and noteworthy starting pitchers on the market this winter.

The Orioles, Yankees, Red Sox, Rangers and Astros have all been mentioned as potential suitors for the left-hander’s services, though Orioles’ GM Dan Duquette said the club has yet to make a play for Hill and ESPN’s Jim Bowden pointed out that the Red Sox are less involved in trade talks than other interested parties.