Report: Ron Washington was being blackmailed

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Ron Washington dugout.jpgRandy Galloway of the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram drops a bomb in last night’s column: Ron Washington and the Rangers were being blackmailed over his positive cocaine test.

Galloway reports that numerous team sources have confirmed that the blackmailer — a team employee who was fired in the offseason — was making
“strong demands.” The obvious upshot: if the demands were not met, Washington’s cocaine story makes national news. Some
of the demands were met, Galloway reports, but the club balked at personally giving the
former employee a recommendation letter and one
other request, which Galloway either doesn’t know about or simply won’t say. Galloway says that by January “the former employee was
bad-mouthing Washington around north Arlington.”

Galloway says “[b]lackmailer was
real unhappy,” and that all was still quiet until this week when Washington received a
call “from a national baseball writer saying he had the Ron-does-dope
details.”  That national baseball writer would be Jon Heyman, the man who broke the story, wouldn’t it?  I trust he didn’t know that his tipster — if that is indeed where he got the story — was a blackmailer as opposed to any other team-connected source.

There’s also no word here that the police were ever involved, but if what Galloway is saying is true,  the Rangers should have alerted them.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.