Beyond Yo La Tengo: The Padres are teaching their employees Spanish

Leave a comment

Spanish book.jpgLots of teams teach English to Latin players. Not too many teach Spanish to the English speakers. The Padres do, however, and it seems like a great idea:

“It’s something I thought was important to make us efficient when
dealing with players when we’re going to the Dominican or with our
players who are just coming here and don’t have command of the English
language yet,” Smith said.

“It shows that as an organization that we’re making an effort
to reach out to these kids. Language is a major issue. I’m asking for
two hours a week for maybe nine hours this spring. It’s a beginning,
it’s a start. Our guys have been receptive to it.”

I’m sure there are some people out there who will drag out the tired old “well, they’re the ones coming to the U.S., so why should we learn their language” argument, but it’s dumb one so please don’t.

For one thing, team employees are more of a constant than any specific ballplayer is, so it makes sense that the former learn Spanish to communicate with a perpetually-changing cast of players rather than simply rely on the players learning English.

But beyond that it seems like the mere effort to teach Spanish would have some cultural/chemistry benefits. I stumbled through French and Italian for a few weeks once while traveling, and though I’m pretty sure I mangled it beyond recognition, the folks I spoke with usually appreciated the effort.  Sure, they laughed, and most of the time they saved me by speaking a much better English than I did their own language, but I think I got along better with everyone simply because I tried.

It may not be a significant thing, but given the relatively meager outlay of time in energy it takes to pick up some phrases and at least get your feet wet with a new language, even a modest uptick in team culture and morale would make the effort worth it, no?

Billy Beane promoted to VP, David Forst named A’s general manager

billy beane getty
1 Comment

I’m so old I remember when general managers used to run baseball operations departments. Now they’re basically assistants.

The latest example: the Oakland Athletics have promoted Billy Beane to vice president of baseball operations and have named David Forst general manager. Forst has been with the A’s for 16 years and has been Beane’s assistant for 12 years, so it’s not exactly a situation in which Forst will be making the final calls. The official move came today, though the move has been in the works for some time, it seems.

Someone with a lot of good front office access is going to write a good story this winter about the title inflation going on in Major League Baseball over the past year. And it’s gonna be great when one of his or her sources breaks the pattern of saying “well, baseball transactions are so much more complex these days . . . ” and admits “hey, if Theo gets a fancy title and La Russa gets a fancy title I WANT A FANCY TITLE TOO.”

Not that it’s much of a secret as it is.

Brewers fire pitching coach Rick Kranitz

Wily Peralta, Rick Kranitz, Hernan Perez, Martin Maldonado
1 Comment

Despite a change at general manager from Doug Melvin to David Stearns the Brewers quickly made it clear that they’re keeping Craig Counsell as manager, but today they fired pitching coach Rick Kranitz.

In fact, all of Milwaukee’s coaches except for hitting coach Darnell Coles and third base coach Ed Sedar were let go, as Counsell shakes up his staff after managing the Brewers to a 61-76 record as Ron Roenicke’s replacement.

Kranitz took over as the Brewers’ pitching coach in 2011, during which time they’ve ranked 11th among NL teams in ERA.