The A's in San Jose: what's it gonna be, Bud?

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So Bud Selig appointed a committee to study the intricacies of maybe possibly hopefully hypothetically moving the Athletics to San Jose.  The problem: the Giants’ territorial rights.  I’m not expert of decision making, but it strikes me that Bud’s committee had to answer a relatively small, relatively simple few questions: (1) Are the A’s viable in Oakland; (2) If no, would the A’s be better off in San Jose; (3) if yes, what is to be done about the San Francisco Giants’ territorial rights.

Easy questions? Not necessarily, but not utter killers either. I think it’s safe to assume that the answer to (1) is no, at least given the realities of Lew Wolff’s ownership and what the people involved are willing to do as opposed to all that is possible to save baseball in Oakland.  From there it’s easy to say that (2) is “yes,” and to the extent there is any specter of doubt in San Jose it’s the San Jose government’s problem, not baseball’s. At least not yet.  That leaves (3), which is how best to buy off the Giants.  Tricky? Sure, but you out a handful of folks in a conference room for an afternoon you can come away with four or five bullet points on how best to attack the problem.

Which makes me wonder why it has taken a year of studying the matter, yet still no report.  At least that’s Bud’s story.  As the Chronicle’s John Shea points out, however, Oakland officials — specifically Mayor Ron Dellums —  said the report is done and that Selig has seen it.  But still, no word from the Commissioner on what they’re gonna do with the Athletics.

One year. The Allied powers figured out how the post-war partition of Europe was going to go down in less time. The Bretton Woods conference established the system that kept financial order for 60 years in less time. It didn’t take too much more than a year to get a man in space after the formation of NASA.  You’d think that a handful of people could figure out how to properly dispose of a baseball team in that time frame. 

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.