Did the Royals just cut their second best reliever?

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It’s still pretty early on in the spring for notable cuts, but one from Tuesday will force me to revise my projections a bit, as the Royals optioned right-hander Carlos Rosa to Triple-A.
Now, I’m sure most won’t care about such a move. Rosa was, at best, going to be a setup man for one of the worst teams in baseball. He was regarded as one of the Royals’ best prospects at one time, but that changed due to injuries that eventually led to his conversion from a starter into a reliever.
Rosa, though, showed some real promise while working out of the pen last year. Here’s the writeup I gave him for the Rotoworld draft guide:

Instead of signing Kyle Farnsworth and Juan Cruz to multi-year deals, maybe the Royals should have just given Rosa a chance to win a job out of spring training last year. The right-hander, who was one possibility to go to the Marlins for Mike Jacobs before Leo Nunez was traded instead, didn’t have an exceptional Triple-A ERA in his first year as a reliever, but he fanned 80 batters and allowed just six homers in 71 innings in the Pacific Coast League. The Royals finally called him up in September and he picked up a save in his season debut on his way to amassing a 3.38 ERA in 10 2/3 innings. Rosa works at 93-96 mph as a reliever, and along with his hard slider, he still uses the average changeup he honed as a starter. The package should make him a nice setup man, perhaps right from the start of 2010. He definitely deserves the opportunity to overtake Farnsworth and Cruz.

Of course, there’s no real harm in the Royals’ decision to send Rosa down for a few weeks in order to take a longer look at Rule 5 pick Edgar Osuna and some guys who are out of options. It’s not like a handful of innings in April are going to make the difference in whether they reach the postseason. It’s just that it’s disappointing how rarely talent seems to win out in Kansas City.

Major League Baseball finds insufficient evidence to discipline Miguel Sano for sexual assualt

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In late December Betsy Bissen, a photographer for the Minnesota Twins website, Twins Daily, alleged that Miguel Sano assaulted her a few years ago. Bissen offered a detailed account of the incident.

In the account she said that in 2015 Sano was at an autograph signing at a store at which she volunteered. After the signing, she alleged that Sano grabbed her wrist and forced her to accompany him to a nearby store, attempted to force her through a doorway near the restrooms, tried to kiss her multiple times and continued to hold her, forcibly and painfully, by her wrist, in an effort to get her into the bathroom with him. She said the struggle lasted for 10 minutes, and her screams for help went unanswered.

Major League Baseball announced that it was investigating the matter. A few moments ago, it announced its findings and that it was declining to discipline Sano:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball has completed its investigation into an assault allegation made against Minnesota Twins third baseman Miguel Sano. The comprehensive investigation included interviews of more than 20 individuals, including Sano and the complainant, as well as a review of available documents, including communication records.

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Office of the Commissioner found that there was insufficient evidence to support a disciplinary determination against Sano, due to conflicting and inconsistent witness accounts and the absence of contemporaneous substantiation. Barring the receipt of any new information or evidence, the Office of the Commissioner will not impose discipline on Sano in connection with the alleged incident.

Based on the text of the statement, one may conclude that the league did not find Bissen’s claims to be credible.

This is first investigation of this type, or pursuant to its domestic violence policy under the umbrella of which this investigation presumably falls, which has not resulted in discipline of some kind. At least investigations of which the public was aware.