Scenes from Spring Training: Phun with the Phillie Phanatics Part 2

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I went into the Phillies clubhouse. Charlie Manuel was there. As was Jimmy Rollins, Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, Jayson Werth and all the other guys which make the Phillies perhaps the most recognizable team in baseball. Yes, even more so than the Yankees. Quick: describe Brett Gardner’s facial features. Now tell me if there’s any Phillie starter you couldn’t pick out of a linuep.

I chatted informally with several players as they suited up and got ready for morning drills, but as I did, I was struck by something I read on a political blog earlier in the week about the value of getting quotes from big sources vs. observing, talking off the record and generally trying to get a handle on the scene instead of getting “the news” as we’ve come to understand it:

I do think anonymity has some value in that by preventing journalists
from doing sensationalist stories based around a single direct quote it
forces you to focus on the big picture of what the officials in
question are trying to say . . . it’s much easier to build an item
around a direct quote so it’s more professionally valuable to
be on the record. But it seems to me that the people who do the real
value-adding reporting are mostly talking to lower-level people–nobody
ever gets the real scoop from anyone remotely senior.

I think this applies to baseball just as much as it applies to reporting on government. If I go up to Ryan Howard with my notepad out or my tape recorder going, and get him to say some things on the record, I’m going to be tempted — or, if I have an editor bird dogging me, required — to build a story around those quotes.  Howard says that everyone in camp is focused to maintain the success they’ve had the past few years. The story the next day leads with that quote and builds around it.  It’s not particularly illuminating, at best serving as the basis for a recap of the competitive challenges facing the team this year, at worst just a quote in a notes column.

I guess my point to all of this is that I think there’s very, very limited value in actually talking to ballplayers on the record and printing those quotes. All of the baseball writers I like tend to limit the amount of that kind of stuff they do. They walk around and talk to guys with their notepads in their bag. They get the big picture of what’s going on and build stories on those themes, but they use their own observations and reason as a filter.  The fans care about what what happens on the field, and they have to report that accurately, but the background stories, the flavor and the non-game info that appears in columns are almost always better when a writer is telling you what he observes and writes thoughtfully about it, not when he’s telling you what a ballplayer, manager or GM says.  Just my two cents.

Enough with these philosophical meta-musings. I took pictures and observed things myself, and I’ll have that post up in about an hour.

Dave Roberts: It “doesn’t make sense” for Scott Kazmir to start year in Dodgers’ rotation

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Scott Kazmir won’t begin the regular season in the Dodgers’ starting rotation. Manager Dave Roberts said after Kazmir’s Cactus League outing on Sunday that it “doesn’t make sense” for the ailing Kazmir to break camp in the rotation, Andy McCullough of the Los Angeles Times reports. The lefty will instead rehab some more and join the rotation at a later time.

Kazmir has been battling a hip issue which has caused his mechanics to suffer. He was clocked in the low 80’s 10 days ago and wasn’t much better on Sunday afternoon.

Last season with the Dodgers, Kazmir posted a 4.56 ERA with a 134/52 K/BB ratio in 136 1/3 innings, his worst numbers since returning to the majors in 2013.

Robert Gsellman wins spot in Mets’ rotation

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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that Robert Gsellman has won the No. 4 spot in the Mets’ starting rotation. He adds that the Mets are likely to play things cautiously with lefty Steven Matz. The fifth and final rotation spot will go to either Zack Wheeler or Seth Lugo.

Gsellman, 23, has had a great spring. The right-hander has allowed three earned runs on 15 hits and four walks with nine strikeouts in 17 1/3 innings. That is on the heels of seven solid starts at the end of the 2016 season during which he yielded 12 earned runs on 40 hits and 12 walks with 40 strikeouts in 41 innings.

Matz, 25, is dealing with irritation in his left elbow. He had surgery in October to remove a bone spur and was a Tommy John patient several years ago. It sounds like the Mets are leaning towards having him start the season on the disabled list.

Wheeler, 26, isn’t having a great spring. He’s surrendered seven runs in 7 1/3 innings. Lugo has given up three earned runs in seven spring innings and also looked solid in the World Baseball Classic although he took the loss in the final against the United States.