Milton Bradley continues to not forget Chicago

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For a guy wanting to put Chicago in his rear view mirror, Milton Bradley keeps looking back.  In an interview with ESPN, Bradley says that his time in the Windy City “was pretty bad,” and that he “would have rather tore my knee up and gone
through rehab all over again then have to deal with that.”

He also expands on his dustup with Lou Piniella in which Lou called Bradley a “piece of s—.”  Bradley:

“The next day, he called me into his office and wanted to apologize. I felt you put me on blast, called me out in front of
everybody, you’re going to apologize in front of everybody. He
didn’t choose to go that route, but I accepted his apology nonetheless,
because as a Christian that’s what you do. I don’t have time to hold
grudges against people, I’ve got enough stuff I’ve got to deal with.”

Much of the rest of the piece is about racist jeers he received and/or perceived while in Chicago.  He’s been remarkably consistent in talking about this since last year, so I’m going to give him the benefit of the doubt on it and assume he’s telling the truth (it’s an ugly world, kids).  But at the same time, you’d hope that a guy in Bradley’s position would try and find a way and blow that kind of garbage off.  But he can’t. Bradley is often called “combustible,” but I think his biggest problem is that he’s one of the most overly-sensitive guys to ever play the game.  Even if that which he has experienced is unacceptable, it’s also not unprecedented, and there are few if any players who have reacted to slights both real and perceived as poorly as Milton Bradley has.

But this may be the worst part of it all:

Bradley said it became so uncomfortable that he rarely left his home. “I was a prisoner in my own home,” he said. “I pretty much stayed at home, ordered in every day, never went anywhere.”

My God. Things got so bad for Milton Bradley last year he became a blogger.

2017 Preview: The National League West

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For the past few weeks we’ve been previewing the 2017 season. Here, in handy one-stop-shopping form, is our package of previews from the National League West.

The Giants had the best record in all of baseball at the All-Star Break and the Dodgers lost the best pitcher in the world in Clayton Kershaw for a big chunk of the season. Yet, somehow, L.A. won the NL West by four games. The biggest culprit was the Giants’ suspect bullpen, which they put some real money toward fixing this winter. Is it enough? Or is a a Dodgers team with a healthy Kershaw just too talented for San Francisco to handle?

Below them is an intriguing Rockies team, though probably not a truly good Rockies team. The Dbacks have a lot of assorted talent but are nonetheless in reshuffle mode following a miserable 2016 campaign. The Padres, meanwhile, are in full-fledged rebuilding mode, but do possess some of the best minor league talent in the game.

Here are our previews of the 2017 NL West:

Los Angeles Dodgers
San Francisco Giants
Colorado Rockies
Arizona Diamondbacks
San Diego Padres

2017 Preview: The American League West

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For the past few weeks we’ve been previewing the 2017 season. Here, in handy one-stop-shopping form, is our package of previews from the American League West

There’s not a lot of separation between the top three teams in this division. Indeed, it would not be a surprise for either the Astros, Rangers or Mariners to end the year on top. Part of that is because none of these contenders are perfect, with all three facing some big challenges in putting together a strong rotation.

Meanwhile, the best baseball player in the universe toils in Anaheim, where he’ll most likely have to content himself to playing spoiler. Up the coast in Oakland . . . um, green is pretty?

Our 2017 AL West Previews:

Houston Astros
Seattle Mariners
Texas Rangers
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
Oakland Athletics