Scenes from Spring Training: Meet The Mets Part 4

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empty dugout.jpgEver been to a gang bang? I hadn’t until yesterday.  What is it? It’s what beat writers call it when five or six of them gather around a single interview subject, usually in the locker room and just fire the questions.  My first gang bang was with Jim Riggleman after the game.  A most peculiar beast.  But I should back up.

Once the game ended, my buddy Knox and I looked at each other and almost simultaneously said “well, what are we supposed to do now?”  I’d been in and out of the Mets clubhouse earlier that day, but there weren’t a lot of people hanging around and there was far more interesting stuff happening elsewhere. What’s the etiquette for the postgame?  Realizing we were total newbies, Knox and I decided to simply follow the other dudes leaving the press box and do what they did.

Our little procession took the elevator down to the main level, and then walked around to the other side of the stadium, past security through a nondescript gate and into the Nats’ clubhouse. Which probably shouldn’t have been surprising given that the group included the Washington Post’s Adam Kilgore (nice guy!) and’s Nats beat writer Bill Ladson (didn’t say much, but he tweets about liking Otis Redding, and that makes him OK in my book).  I was actually happy we were going to the Nats side of the place because I hadn’t been in there earlier.

Our group — led by the Nats media guy, who apparently did make the trip after all, and never once said anything about me sitting in a press box seat reserved for him — went back to manager Jim Riggleman’s office. Riggleman talked about the Santos grand slam, explaining that Taveras didn’t simply throw his hands up and say the ball was stuck in the fence because he thought the umpire had already seen the ball and ruled it was in play, mooting any appeal. Turns out that the moment Taveras tried to pick up the ball is when the ump truly ruled, figuring that since Taveras didn’t throw his hands up, the ball was playable.  Hard call. Taveras’ instincts understandably took over, and you’d think the ump would be a bit more vocal about where things stood.  Baseball, she is tough game.

Beyond that there was nothing enlightening. Riggleman thought Marquis was just fine despite walking everyone, essentially saying it was spring training and all he cared about was the guy getting work.  No argument there.  He was asked if Ian Desmond — who once again looked great — has a chance to break camp with the club. Riggleman said “we have to wait and see.”  Other than the Santos inside-the-parker there wasn’t a question asked that everyone didn’t already know the answer too, and not a question that seemed all that interesting to ask sprung to mind.

This continued as the Riggleman gang bang broke up and the reporters filtered out to the clubhouse, where we were met with a dozen or so Nats players in their underwear (at most) eating pizza and looking tired after a long game.  It struck me at that moment that the last thing any of these guys wanted to do was to answer media questions. They just wanted to eat their pizza, shower up, get on the bus and head back to Viera.  I felt like I was imposing, even if I had a right to be there.

It also struck me at that moment that, no matter what I’ve ever said about beat writers in the past, they have the hardest jobs in sports. Unlike opinion writers like me, they’re all expected to extract something — anything — interesting from the underwear and pizza crowd. And like me, they know 99% of the answers to the questions that are going to get asked before they ask them (and really, the mood of a postgame clubhouse just isn’t right for off-the-wall questions; too businesslike).

Yet they have to ask them because they have to write a game story. And unlike me, who has the luxury of chewing on some answers for 12 hours to see if I can’t gain some odd insight to them, the beat guys are all on a hard deadline. They need to bang out the copy, make it good, and start all over again tomorrow.  I said earlier this morning that writing about baseball is the best job going. And it probably is. But I could see, in that clubhouse, how it could quickly become a grind.  We love our baseball. We love to watch our players. But the time and manner in which the media is expected to talk to them and learn from them is limiting in the extreme.  All of it gave me a new found respect and sympathy for the beat writer. They have a much, much harder job than you can imagine.

After a quick walk through the clubhouse Knox and I left, our work basically done for the day.  I went back to my hotel to write a bit, then grabbed a sandwich and a beer at a big silly sports bar near the ballpark.  David Wright was in there, as well as a few of his teammates whose names I couldn’t put with their faces (it’s a lot harder to tell who’s who when they’re not in uniform). The people at the surrounding tables kept gawking at the group, and many stopped by to say a word or two or to get an autograph. Wright was friendly and pleasant with all of them, despite the fact that he was simply trying to eat some dinner.

After my sandwich I walked next door to a movie theater and watched “Shutter Island.”  It was a good, weird movie. But not as weird as the fact that Oliver Stone has apparently made a sequel to “Wall Street,” the trailer for which I saw.

And not as good — not by damn sight — as a day at the ballpark.

Royals avoid arbitration with Tim Collins for $1.475 million

Tim Collins Getty
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Left-hander Tim Collins, who missed the entire 2015 season following Tommy John elbow surgery, will remain with the Royals after avoiding arbitration for a one-year, $1.475 million contract.

Collins was a non-tender candidate due to his injury and projected salary via arbitration, but the Royals are convinced he can bounce back to be a valuable part of the bullpen again in 2016 and beyond. He agreed to the same salary he made in 2015.

Prior to blowing out his elbow Collins posted a 3.54 ERA with 220 strikeouts in 211 innings from 2011-2014 and he’s still just 26 years old. He figures to begin 2016 in a middle relief role.

Joba Chamberlain signs with the Indians

Joba Chamberlain

When you think “Joba Chamberlain” and “Cleveland” you think of the then-Yankees phenom being attacked by midges in the 2007 ALDS. If you don’t remember that somehow, the video evidence is below.

But all of that changes now, as the Indians have just announced that they have signed Chamberlain to a minor league deal with an invitation to big league spring training. That’s no promise of a big league job, but the Indians did make at least one promise to him:


I can vouch for that. The Indians’ Triple-A team is in Columbus and we don’t have midges here.

Chamberlain split time with the Royals and the Tigers in 2015, posting a composite ERA of 4.88 in 36 games of mostly mopup work.

Mariners trying to trade Mark Trumbo by Wednesday

Mark Trumbo

Seattle making Mark Trumbo available has been known for a while now, but Bob Dutton of the Tacoma News Tribune reports that the Mariners are trying to trade the first baseman/outfielder before Wednesday.

That’s the deadline to tender 2016 contracts to arbitration eligible players and with Trumbo set to make around $9 million via that process the Mariners would rather move on before any decision needs to be made. In other words: They don’t want to be stuck with him.

Trumbo has elite power, averaging 30 homers per 160 games for his career, but that power comes with a .250 batting average, poor plate discipline and a .299 on-base percentage, and sub par defense. Mariners general manager Jerry Dipoto has already traded Trumbo once, dealing him to the Diamondbacks back when he was the Angels’ general manager, and now he’s working hard to part ways again.

Ken Rosenthal of reports that the Rockies are among the interested teams.

UPDATE: Red Sox sign outfielder Chris Young to a two-year, $13 million deal

Chris Young Getty

UPDATE: Ken Rosenthal reports that Young will receive a two-year, $13 million contract from the Red Sox.

Monday, 1:47 PM: Veteran outfielder Chris Young thrived in a platoon role for the Yankees this past season and now he’s headed to the rival Red Sox to fill a similar role, signing a multi-year deal with Boston according to Ken Rosenthal of

Young was once an everyday center fielder for the Diamondbacks, making the All-Star team in 2010 at age 26, but for the past 3-4 years he’s gotten 300-350 plate appearances in a part-time role facing mostly left-handed pitching. He hit .252 with 14 homers and a .773 OPS for the Yankees, but prior to that failed to top a .700 OPS in 2013 or 2014.

Given the Red Sox’s outfield depth–Mookie Betts, Rusney Castillo, Jackie Bradley Jr., and Brock Holt even with Hanley Ramirez back in the infield–Young is unlikely to work his way into everyday playing time at age 32, but he should get another 300 or so plate appearances while also providing a veteran fallback option. And it’s possible his arrival clears the way for a trade.