The Jose Reyes-HGH doc thing actually reflects pretty well on the Mets' medical staff

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As was reported over the weekend, Jose Reyes was questioned by the FBI about his association with a Canadian doctor who is under investigation
for drug violations, including conspiring to smuggle human growth
hormone into the United States from Canada. Unless Reyes was dumb enough to lie to the FBI he’s probably not in any legal trouble. But based on an account of Reyes’ visit to Canada that ran in the New York Times last December, I’m guessing that some members of the Mets’ medical staff will be talking to the FBI soon:

In the case of Reyes, a two-time All-Star, Mets officials tried to
change Greenberg’s mind about sending him to Galea. They relented
because under the collective bargaining agreement, players have a right
to see a doctor of their choice, and Reyes was clear about wanting to
go. So shortly after the All-Star break, Greenberg and an official from
the Mets’ medical staff traveled to Toronto with Reyes, who received
plasma therapy there from Galea.

The Mets insisted on having a
member of their medical staff on the trip because they wanted someone
to be with Reyes and Galea at all times. Uneasy with the situation,
they wanted to be sure that Galea did not give Reyes any substances
that were banned under baseball’s drug-testing program, said the people
with knowledge of what occurred.

I have two thoughts:

1. For as much as I’ve slammed the Mets’ adventures in the world of medicine recently, kudos to them for doing as much as they could to monitor Reyes’ trip up north to have his blood spun. While there is anecdotal evidence of the procedure working wonders, it’s still an experimental and controversial treatment that could very well serve as a means of introducing PEDs into a player’s system. I’ve read some commentary criticizing the Mets for allowing Reyes to see Dr. Galea, but the fact is the Mets couldn’t stop Reyes from doing this and at least they didn’t just look the other way once their player decided to go see a doctor with some shady associations;

2. Do any of you know anyone at the FBI?  Because, really, as long as the Mets’ doctors are going to be answering questions, perhaps we can arrange it for someone to ask them to give us the straight story on Kelvim Escobar. Something tells me that when faced with the threat of perjury they’ll come off their “he’s right on schedule with his rehab” jazz.

The Giants are calling up Jae-gyun Hwang

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The Giants will call up infielder Jae-gyun Hwang from Triple-A Sacramento on Wednesday, NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic reports.

Hwang, 29, signed with the Giants as a free agent from South Korea. He’ll earn a prorated salary of $1.5 million in the majors and has a chance to earn up to an additional $1.6 million in performance bonuses.

At Triple-A, Hwang hit .287/.333/.476 with seven home runs and 44 RBI in 279 plate appearances. He has mostly played first and third base, but also spent 17 defensive innings in left field. First base is spoken for with Brandon Belt, but Hwang could get the occasional start at the hot corner or in left field in San Francisco.

Hwang spent the previous 10 seasons in the Korean Baseball Organization. In his final season with the Lotte Giants last year, he hit .335/.397/.570 with 27 homers and 113 RBI.

Report: Pete Mackanin fined Odubel Herrera for attempting to steal despite red light

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CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury reports that Phillies outfielder Odubel Herrera was fined an undisclosed amount by manager Pete Mackanin for attempting to steal a base on Saturday against the Diamondbacks despite being given a red light. Herrera, arguably the Phillies’ best base runner, usually has a green light, but Mackanin felt that Herrera stealing and opening up first base would have prompted the D-Backs to intentionally walk Cameron Rupp to get to the pitcher’s spot in the lineup.

The incident occurred in the top of the sixth inning with the Phillies trailing 3-2. Starter Robbie Ray got the first two Phillies out, but Herrera kept the inning alive with a line drive single to right field. Before the second pitch to Rupp, Ray picked off Herrera in a play that was scored 1-3-4.

According to Salisbury, although Mackanin wouldn’t confirm or deny that he fined Herrera, he did say, “Base running matters.”

This is not the first base running blunder Herrera has had this season. Last week, Herrera ran through third base coach Juan Samuel’s stop sign in an attempt to score the game-winning run. And it’s also not the first bit of contention between Mackanin and his players. There was apparently some miscommunication between him and reliever Pat Neshek last week as well.

The Phillies enter play Tuesday night with baseball’s worst record at 24-51. That puts them on pace for a 52-110 season.