Chan Ho Park: "Philadelphia was the No. 1 choice"

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Almost immediately after it was announced that the Yankees had signed Chan Ho Park for $1.2 million, Phillies fans went crazy, wondering why one of the only truly effective relievers they had last year was able to get away so cheaply and easily. Park says it was all on the Phillies:

“I had a wish after the season. Philadelphia was the No. 1
choice. I had a tough time leaving there. I had much support from fans
and community, and I had the best teammates there, so -” . . . Asked why negotiations with the Phillies failed, Park said: “Too late.
Too late. Too late. It didn’t work well in the beginning, and later on,
too late. . . . They were talking, and it didn’t work. Trying to get a
deal, and it didn’t work out. And then later on they just gave up, and
I lost.”

The article goes on to note that Park was disappointed in Charlie Manuel making oblique jabs at Park’s toughness, saying when the team signed Danys Baez and Jose Contreras that they were pitchers who would never refuse to take the ball.

What the article doesn’t note — and what was rumored early in the offseason — is that Park was (a) telling the Phillies that he wanted to start; and (b) telling the Phillies that he wanted a lot more money than he ended up getting from the Yankees, so it’s probably worth taking the “why in the hell didn’t Amaro re-sign Park” stuff you hear from your pfriends in Philly with a grain of salt.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.