The Mariners say bye-bye to barbells

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Mariners logo.gifNo pumping iron for the M’s:

Just got out of the Mariners weight room down here, which, I have to
say, is almost completely devoid of weights. The Mariners, as we
mentioned yesterday on the blog, have signed a three-year contract with Dr. Marcus Elliott of Santa Barbara, Calif., founder
of the Peak Performance Project (P3). Elliott has been working with
Mariners trainers the past couple of months to overhaul the team’s
entire approach to fitness. In a nutshell, the idea is to focus on
reducing injuries and making Seattle players more athletic through a
series of workouts that have little to do with traditional
weightlifting.

Instead, the team will focus on strengthening the movements used in
baseball — things like the ability to generate force through a
player’s hip rotation.

Used to be that people said baseball players shouldn’t lift weights because they were supposed to stay limber and loose. Then everyone lifted weights and credited that for all the home runs. Then everyone said that the weight lifting didn’t do anything, it was really the steroids. Now we’re trying something new.

I have no idea what sort of conditioning really works the best. Usually the best results are realized by whatever conditioning program the really good baseball players are doing.  If the Mariners win 95 games this year more teams will sell the weights next year.  If they win 79 people will forget this little experiment ever happened.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.