Baseball set a revenue record in 2009

Leave a comment

Money Bag.jpg2009 saw the highest rate of men selling apples on street corners and people eating ketchup and sawdust for dinner since the the Great Depression — maybe; that’s the sense I got from reading recession-porn all year, anyway — but baseball didn’t feel the pinch one bit.  Take it away Maury Brown:

The league reports that gross revenues were $6.6 billion for 2009, a
record figure for the league. The figure is a 1.5 percent increase the
$6.5 billion pulled in for 2008.

The increase of revenues comes against the backdrop of MLB seeing a decline in attendance this past year. While still the fifth highest on record, MLB saw a total paid-attendance figure of 73,418,529 for 2009, a decrease of 6.58 percent from a total of 78,591,116 in 2008.

Baseball focused heavily on promotions and affordable ticket options
in many ballparks, helping to keep in-ballpark revenues afloat during
the chilly economy. The increase also can be attributed to centralized
revenue streams through television, radio, MLB Advanced Media, and
merchandise sales.

A key factor in the increase can also be laid at the feet of the
Yankees and Mets. Both clubs opening new stadiums this past year, and
charged premium prices for tickets.

My contribution to this included a seldom used MLB.tv account, a new Braves hat for me, a Cubs hat for my son, tickets to a couple of Reds games, probably around 100 games watched on TV, approximately 2,349,872 clicks on MLB.com for blog-fodder and in the neighborhood of 60 cents in loose changed dropped from my backpack while loading and unloading stuff at the Winter Meetings, which I’m sure Selig picked up later after everyone went down to the bar.

You’re welcome, Major League Baseball.

Will Middlebrooks carted off field with injury

Getty Images
3 Comments

Phillies third baseman Will Middlebrooks suffered a serious injury during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Orioles. The infielder was chasing down a pop fly in the eighth inning when he ran into left fielder Andrew Pullin, who inadvertently trapped Middlebrooks’ ankle under his leg. Middlebrooks was unable to put weight on his leg following the collision and was carted off the field and taken to a local hospital for X-rays.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, not much is known yet about the severity of the ankle injury or the recovery time it will require, though it appears serious enough to set Middlebrooks back considerably as he seeks a backup/bench role with the team this spring.

The 29-year-old is currently seeking another opportunity to extend his six-year major-league career in 2018. He’s coming off of two down years with the Brewers and Rangers, during which he slashed a cumulative .169/.229/.262 with four extra bases through 70 plate appearances.