Johnny Damon contract details

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Buster Olney has them. In addition to his $8 million:

  • He gets $500,000 for winning the MVP Award, $200,000 for finishing second through fifth, and $100,000 for finishing sixth through tenth;

  • He gets $100,000
    for being voted in as an All-Star, $50,000 for being selected as a reserve;

  • $100,000 for winning the Gold Glove and another $100,000 for the Silver Slugger;

  • $150,000 for winning the ALCS MVP; $200,000 for being the World Series MVP; and

  • He gets a suite on the road.

If the Tigers win the AL Central and Damon doesn’t fall off a cliff I could totally see him getting some MVP votes due to writers thinking he’s a difference maker or a leader or something. All it takes to place 10th is roughly 7-10 of the 28 voters to think you’re one of the top 10 candidates.

The All-Star incentives are less likely to happen. Damon was voted 7th among AL outfielders last season, and that’s with a pretty darn good first half on the Yankees. As for getting selected as a reserve, his former manager Joe Girardi is doing the selecting for whatever that’s worth.

The postseason MVP awards are utterly unpredictable. The suite on road trips is an increasingly popular contract perk among star players. I often wonder what the guys who don’t get suites think of that.

How about that Gold Glove incentive?  If I’m the Tigers I’m not going to worry about setting money aside for that one. Damon is more likely to win Best Actress, a MacArthur Genius Grant or the Nobel Prize for literature before he snags a fielding award.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.