Is it time for Cano to be clutch?

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Robinson Cano.jpgJohn Harper of the Daily News thinks that Robinson Cano needs to step things up:

More than Curtis Granderson, more than Nick Johnson, the onus falls on Cano to fill the clutch gap. Indeed, it’s time for Cano to prove he’s more than a great talent, a status he reaffirmed in 2009 with a big rebound season.

In 2010 the Yankees need for him to prove he can be a great hitter as well, one who understands situations and delivers when it counts most.

Harper goes on to note that Cano should have won a Gold Glove but that “part of winning those types of awards is earning respect around the
league as a true star, and a big part of that is earning a reputation
for being clutch.”

“There was a streak when [Cano] had made about 10 or 11 outs in a row with
runners in scoring position, and he hit nine bullets. Over the long term that usually irons itself out, but when you don’t
have 600,000 at-bats, it doesn’t iron out. His at-bats, a lot of times
were very good with runners in scoring position. I didn’t think he had
a lot of luck last year”

Practicing better patience and realizing better luck sounds like an easier trick to pull off than taking peyote, entering a Ute Indian sweat lodge and trying to commune with the Clutch Gods or whatever process Harper thinks it is that turns mere ballplayers into clutch hitters.

Josh Donaldson is still seeking a long-term deal with the Blue Jays

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If it were up to him, Blue Jays third baseman Josh Donaldson would finish the remainder of his career in Toronto. In fact, he’d be “ticked pink” if the club decided to sign him to a long-term deal. Whether the Blue Jays share that sentiment is still unclear, as Donaldson said Saturday that the team has yet to engage his agent in extension talks.

“I’ve said that I wanted to be here,” he told MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm. “That’s pretty much all I can say. I’m not the one who makes the decisions, nor would I try to put them in the position to do that. Like I said, I believe the situation will become more fluid when the time is right.”

That doesn’t necessarily mean an extension is out of the question. The Blue Jays reached an unprecedented one-year, $23 million agreement with the three-time All-Star in arbitration, and have been reticent to field trade offers despite continued interest from the Cardinals this winter.

Donaldson, 32, is poised to enter his eighth season in the majors and fourth with the Blue Jays. In 2017, he batted .270/.385/.559 with 33 home runs and a .944 OPS in 496 plate appearances, ranking sixth among all major league third baseman with 5.0 fWAR. He’s scheduled to enter free agency following the 2018 season.