Jenks gives up the bottle, sheds some pounds

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White Sox closer Bobby Jenks, whose reputation for hard partying preceded him to the majors, told MLB.com that he quit drinking over the winter and the decision has helped him lose 25 pounds.
Jenks claims he was never an alcoholic, but he said he felt the need to quit cold turkey for his sake and that of his family.
“Getting [drunk] every night. Let’s put it plain and simple,” Jenks said. “When I took a long, hard look at myself and saw where I was headed, at that point, I was headed in the wrong direction.”
Jenks has had run-ins with management in recent months, mostly about his weight and conditioning, but he said this was a decision he made on his own.
“I just got tired of it, plain and simple,” Jenks said. “When you want a bad habit out of your life, either you wean yourself off or you quit cold turkey.
With his salary up to $7.5 million and other possible closers already on the roster, Jenks knows he could be taking part in his last spring with the White Sox. It’s imperative that he put together a strong season if he expects to make similar dollars in 2011 and beyond. Taking better care of himself is an important first step. However, he realizes the next several months might be more challenging than the last few.
“Actually, it was both: tougher and easier than I thought,” said Jenks of giving up drinking. “During the season, on the plane rides, hanging out with the guys, that’s going to be the challenge, the real test comes this season. I’ve passed one this offseason. Spring training is next and then I’ll think about the season when it starts.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.