Someone actually cares about MLB's gun policy

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When Major League Baseball decided Saturday to officially outlaw guns in clubhouses we figured the story would draw a few laughs and maybe some snarky remarks.  What we didn’t expect, however, was serious, disappointed reaction from a current professional.

According to the always reliable St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Cardinals closer Ryan Franklin didn’t take too kindly to the rule change:
“If you grew up around it, being in the outdoors and stuff, I was taught as a young kid to respect firearms,” Franklin said after a Saturday workout. “First of all, you don’t get stupid with it.  Always treat a gun like it’s loaded.  That’s what I taught my son and daugthers.  There’s a place for them. … If it wasn’t for the NFL guy a couple years ago brining a weapon to a nightclub … you’ve just got to be smart.
To us, “smart” is ensuring that no firearm ever finds its way into an MLB workplace, period.  And that’s exactly why the new policy was put into effect.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”