Could Johnny Damon still end up in Atlanta?

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Many assume that if the White Sox indeed pull their offer to Johnny Damon it pretty much means the “Tigers or bust,” but don’t forget that the Braves have already offered Damon a one-year contract with some deferred money — somewhere around $4 million or less.

After Friday’s developments, Braves general manager Frank Wren told Mark Bowman of MLB.com that “Nothing has changed on our end.” This doesn’t really mean anything to me, other than saying “our original offer still stands.”

Even though the Tigers are known to have offered at least a one-year, $7 million contract, David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution still thinks there’s a “reasonable chance” Damon winds up with the Braves:

It’s seemed odd to me that the Braves’ interest in Damon was
practically dismissed by a couple of other media outlets in the last
week, Atlanta described as having only lackluster interest and not
making a serious push for him.

The team that made him an offer nearly two weeks ago, before Detroit or the Chicago White Sox made offers. The team that had Chipper Jones call
Damon the same day it made its offer, to emphasize to him how much the
Braves wanted him and how well he’d fit in their lineup and on their
team.

I think it’s pretty simple. Scott Boras wanted to dangle Damon in the AL Central for a while to see if he could create some sort of mini bidding war. It doesn’t seem to be working. This posturing has been fun and all (not really), but it’s high-time for Damon to step up and make his preference known, no matter the salary.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.