The Indians ink Branyan

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Branyan headshot.jpgBuster Olney reports that Cleveland has signed Russell Branyan to a one year deal with an option for 2011.  This year it’s a $2 million base salary with up to $1 million in incentives.  The option is of the mutual variety for $5 million. The seal is a juuuuuuust a bit below the $20-$30 million Branyan had reportedly been seeking earlier this offseason. The option adds a bit of security for Branyan, however, inasmuch as if he’s even moderately productive this year he’ll at least have a job for next year. Which is a relatively new experience for him.

As I’ve said before, I think the Indians and Branyan are a good match.  There’s no telling how healthy Matt LaPorta is going to be at first base. Jhonny Peralta has been the subject of trade rumors off and on for a while, and while maybe the 17th time is the charm for Andy Marte, there is no reason to think that he’s the answer at either corner.  Branyan could also see some time in left field.

My guess: Branyan gets a healthy number of plate appearances, he hits his incentives and at the end of the year people will be talking about this as one of the more savvy signings of the offseason.

UPDATE:  A few words on “mutual options.”  I used to always say that mutual options were meaningless in that, given either side can veto, it really doesn’t provide any security for anyone, contrary to what I said about Branyan above.  Except every time I wrote that someone would comment and say, no, it does provide security in that it creates a framework for a deal, etc. etc.  So fine, I decided I didn’t want the fight this time and just said what I said above. And as soon as I did people started asking me what kind of security a mutual option truly gives Branyan. Ugh.

So I have decided to punt and let Google be my friend. I love Google because it almost always introduces you to smart people saying interesting things. In this case it brought me to Rich Lederer — I already knew him, so it really wasn’t an introduction — who wrote many words about mutual options a couple of years ago, with the conclusion basically being “mutual options are meaningless.”  Click and read. You’ll be happy you did.

For my part: if my employer offered me a “mutual option” I probably wouldn’t sign it, because it sounds kind of weasely and ineffective. So there’s that.

Marlins, Mariners are “fairly close” on a trade for David Phelps

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Jon Morosi reports that the Mariners and the Marlins are “fairly close” on a trade that would send reliever David Phelps to Seattle. Earlier Ken Rosenthal and others reported that the sides were talking, but that a deal was not imminent.

Phelps, 30, had a fantastic 2016 season, posting a 2.28 ERA in 64 games while striking out 11.8 batters per nine innings. He’s not been as strong this year, but he’s still been a solid setup man, posting a 3.45 ERA in 44 games while striking out 51 batters and walking 21 in 47 innings. He throws in the mid-90s and induces grounders. Basically everything you want in a reliever, right?

The Mariners could probably use rotation help more than bullpen help, but solid innings are solid innings at one point and improving your pen takes some of the pressure off of your rotation.

 

Corey Seager has more homers than any other shortstop in Los Angeles Dodgers history

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Corey Sager homered in the Dodgers’ win over the White Sox last night. It was his 45th career homer, 44 of which have come while playing shortstop. While that’s great given that the guy has only played in 270 games, it’s not a lot of homers in an absolute sense. Thousands of players have more homers than that, obviously. Baseball has been around for a long time!

But it’s enough to set a record. A Los Angeles Dodgers record, specifically, for the most homers from a shortstop. It puts Seager past Rafael Furcal, who hit 43 while wearing Dodger blue. The record for the franchise, including Brooklyn, is Pee Wee Reese, who hit 122.

It seems astounding that no other Dodgers shortstop has hit more than 44 homers in the nearly 60 years since the club has been in Los Angeles, but it’s true. If you had asked me before I saw the factoid mentioned on Twitter I would’ve bet my life that Bill Russell would’ve had more. Not because he had any power — he was, in fact, one of the more punchless players of his era — but because he simply played in L.A. so long, logging 1,746 games at short for Walt Alston and Tommy Lasorda. Nope. He only hit 46 in his 18-year career, with a handful of those coming as an outfielder. His season high is seven. Seager has hit seven homers in May of his rookie season.

Oh well, you learn something new every day.