Source: Kelvim Escobar may be seriously hurt

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UPDATEAdam Rubin of the Daily News tweets:

Johan Santana played catch with him all week and said Escobar having trouble gripping a baseball would be untrue.

Santana’s not a doctor of course and a playing catch grip is different than a pitching-at-full-speed grip, but this, at the very least, undercuts my earlier report.  Obviously I’ll update with anything new that comes out.

11:15 A.M: It was reported yesterday that Mets’ pitcher Kelvim Escobar is suffering from a sore shoulder and will be limited as spring training gets going down in Port St. Lucie.  It may be much more serious than that, however: a source tells me that
Escobar isn’t even able to grip a baseball right now, and there are
concerns that he’s seriously injured.

I called the Mets just now, and a team spokesman said
that they had no comment beyond what’s being reported in the papers
today. We’ll obviously update as soon as we hear something
further, but right now it seems that someone who knows someone with the Mets will have to do the confirming here, because they aren’t talking about it.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.