Mark McGwire speaks

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Earlier today he showed up. A few minutes ago he spoke:

He spoke about the “learning curve” he’ll have with the hitters,
specifically expanding his pool of pupils from two or three hitters to
the 13 or more that he’ll have to work with here in spring. He spoke
about the “regrets” he has from his playing career and steroid-use. And
he stressed that he is ready to “move on” from his admission, even as
he understands the questions will linger.

Asked how long he will be asked these questions, he responded:
“That’s up to you guys. I’ve accepted responsibility. I can’t tell you
how many times that I’m truly sorry. It’s a very, very regrettable
situation that I put myself in. I’m just ready to move on, and I hope
everybody else can. It would be a better place if we move on and make
this a positive thing.”

McGwire also said — again — that insofar as they allowed him to play more often, yes, steroids helped him hit home runs. He stuck to his guns, however, and said that the ability to hit home runs was his own. Which is a perfectly legitimate and understandable opinion for McGwire to have of the matter. If anyone wants to continue to take issue with that it strikes me that they need to bring some actual scientific evidence regarding the effects of steroids on hitting. If they don’t, they’re complaining about McGwire’s opinions of himself, not his candor.

At any rate, it seems that at this point there is nothing more we can expect the man to say on the matter of his own personal steroid history. He has a job in baseball, and he’s trying to do it.  If “questions linger” it’s only because the writers wish only to talk about the past.

Report: Orioles interested in Jarrod Dyson

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Free agent outfielder Jarrod Dyson is still a possible target for the Orioles, according to Roch Kubatko of MASNsports.com. The outfielder has received limited interest after entering free agency this season, due in part to the season-ending sports hernia surgery he underwent last September. To that end, Kubatko says, the team has verified his medicals and no red flags appear to have surfaced so far.

Dyson, 33, managed a modest .251/.324/.350 batting line, five home runs and 28 stolen bases in 390 plate appearances for the Mariners last year. He didn’t overwhelm the competition at the plate, particularly during an injury-riddled second half, but still showed himself capable of maintaining the speed and defense that have become his calling cards over the last five seasons. Kubatko notes that while Dyson doesn’t appear to be seeking an everyday role again in 2018, he could be a “useful player” for Baltimore if he remains healthy.

The Giants have also tossed their hats in the ring for Dyson this winter, going so far as to call him their primary non-Lorenzo Cain candidate. Nothing is close to being finalized, however, and ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that both Dyson and the Giants are still talking to other interested parties. The Orioles, too, are exploring alternatives to Dyson, and are rumored to be in talks with an anonymous right fielder who could conceivably platoon in right field and help provide depth behind Adam Jones in center.