Joe Mauer is good at everything

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Bob Nightengale has a lengthy article on Joe Mauer in USA Today, um, today, painting a picture of a regular guy who, it seems anyway, wouldn’t quite know what to do with $200 million:

On his way to the Sony Computer Entertainment studio in San Diego to do motion-capture work for the video game, Mauer’s Lincoln Town Car rolls up to an In-N-Out Burger in El Toro, Calif. The window rolls down, and from the passenger seat, he orders a Double-Double with fries. When you’re an unassuming kid from St. Paul, why
bother with expensive seafood or steak on a three-day trip to
California when you can order from one of your favorite fast-food
joints?

Then again, Mauer passed on a luxury vehicle
when he got a $5.15 million bonus in 2001 for signing out of high
school, and he now drives a truck. His only indulgence is a cabin north
of the Twin Cities, a ranch with batting cages, bowling alley, movie
theater, recording booth (yes, he sings), hockey/fishing pond and
plenty of hunting land . . .

. . . “He just hangs out, plays videos and beats us in anything. He’s a great
golfer. He bowls with two hands. Good ping-pong player. He’s a great
skater. He can dance like Michael Jackson. We haven’t found anything he’s not good at. It’s kind of annoying.”

Big ups to Mauer on the Double-Double with fries — and how nice it is to hear that none of his family and friends see him leaving Minnesota — but anytime I hear stories like this about ballplayers — about how unassuming they are and all of that — I’m taken back to that thing Bill James once wrote about Dwight Gooden. About how when ballplayers come up and have a lot of early success, how they’re always talked about as being such fine young men.  James said that sportswriters — “either despite their cynicism of because of it” — are desperately want to believe that athletes are heroes and saints until the very moment that they prove not to be, and then they feel betrayed.

This stuff about Mauer is less about him being a hero than merely a nice, sensible young man, but the dynamic is the same. Why else do you travel to Minnesota to talk to his friends unless you’re doing it to push the “Mauer would never leave Minnesota for more money” story along?  What will the story look like if the Twins decide to lowball him and he bolts for Boston next year?  Will we still hear about his ranch, his video games and his Double-Doubles, or will we hear more about Joe Mauer, Inc., moving to the East Coast?

For what it’s worth I think he will stay in Minnesota, but if he does it will almost certainly be because it makes good business sense for him, not because of some inherent goodness in him that renders the same considerations every other ballplayer makes somehow irrelevant. 

Angel Pagan body-slammed a fan on the field

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 13: Angel Pagan #16 of the San Francisco Giants argues with umpire Jerry Meals #41 after a called third strike during the first inning against the San Diego Padres at AT&T Park on September 13, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)
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Don’t interrupt Angel Pagan in the middle of a wild card race. Better yet, don’t interrupt him at all.

A fan learned that the hard way during Friday’s Giants-Dodgers game. In the fourth inning, a group of fans ran onto the field with white flowers in their hands, presumably to hand to Giants players. According to eyewitness accounts, one player was reprimanded by San Francisco starter Madison Bumgarner, while Buster Posey fended off another.

Angel Pagan, however, took more extreme and inventive measures.

On-field security started closing in on the fan as he approached Pagan, but didn’t appear to pick up the pace until the outfielder dropped him on the field.

Vin Scully, who was wrapping up the third-to-last game of his career, provided play-by-play of the incident.

A couple of kids, trying to steal a moment, slow down the game, running on the field and just taking a big moment on the big stage. They’ve got one of them in right field, and the other one is nailed down by Pagan in left field. And the crowd loved that! They went up to do something with Angel Pagan, but [Pagan] grabbed him and slammed him to the ground, and they’re taking him off the field. […] Doesn’t that bring you back to the ’60s, and the flower children? Oh what, you don’t remember the ’60s? Okay.

The next time you want to send a message to a player, maybe try a tweet (throw in a flower emoji or two if you feel so inclined). Just don’t make a showy display of affection in the middle of a game. It’s bound to go badly, at least where Angel Pagan is concerned.

The Rangers have home-field advantage through postseason

ARLINGTON, TX - SEPTEMBER 30:  Yu Darvish #11 of the Texas Rangers throws against the Tampa Bay Rays in the first inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on September 30, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Thanks to Yu Darvish, the Rangers will enter the postseason as the No. 1 seed in the American League.

Darvish was outstanding on Friday night, pegging the Rays with a 3-1 loss on three hits, a run, and 12 strikeouts over six innings. It was the crown jewel of performances for the right-hander, who is carrying a 3.53 ERA and 2.3 fWARP in his first season since undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2015.

The Rangers, who have gone 1-5 on days when they’ve offered Darvish fewer than four runs of support, eked out a two-run lead against Tampa Bay starter Matt Andriese. Adrian Beltre roped an RBI single in the first inning, followed by a pair of solo shots from Carlos Beltran and Rougned Odor in the third and sixth innings.

With the win, the Rangers clinched home-field advantage through the World Series, thanks to a 4-2 win in the All-Star Game back in July. Getting to the World Series will present another challenge entirely, though Darvish figures to stay in the mix with Cole Hamels as the Rangers build toward the Division Series on Thursday. If they advance against the wild card winner in the ALDS, they’ll face either the Indians or the Red Sox in the Championship Series.