Joe Mauer is good at everything

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Bob Nightengale has a lengthy article on Joe Mauer in USA Today, um, today, painting a picture of a regular guy who, it seems anyway, wouldn’t quite know what to do with $200 million:

On his way to the Sony Computer Entertainment studio in San Diego to do motion-capture work for the video game, Mauer’s Lincoln Town Car rolls up to an In-N-Out Burger in El Toro, Calif. The window rolls down, and from the passenger seat, he orders a Double-Double with fries. When you’re an unassuming kid from St. Paul, why
bother with expensive seafood or steak on a three-day trip to
California when you can order from one of your favorite fast-food
joints?

Then again, Mauer passed on a luxury vehicle
when he got a $5.15 million bonus in 2001 for signing out of high
school, and he now drives a truck. His only indulgence is a cabin north
of the Twin Cities, a ranch with batting cages, bowling alley, movie
theater, recording booth (yes, he sings), hockey/fishing pond and
plenty of hunting land . . .

. . . “He just hangs out, plays videos and beats us in anything. He’s a great
golfer. He bowls with two hands. Good ping-pong player. He’s a great
skater. He can dance like Michael Jackson. We haven’t found anything he’s not good at. It’s kind of annoying.”

Big ups to Mauer on the Double-Double with fries — and how nice it is to hear that none of his family and friends see him leaving Minnesota — but anytime I hear stories like this about ballplayers — about how unassuming they are and all of that — I’m taken back to that thing Bill James once wrote about Dwight Gooden. About how when ballplayers come up and have a lot of early success, how they’re always talked about as being such fine young men.  James said that sportswriters — “either despite their cynicism of because of it” — are desperately want to believe that athletes are heroes and saints until the very moment that they prove not to be, and then they feel betrayed.

This stuff about Mauer is less about him being a hero than merely a nice, sensible young man, but the dynamic is the same. Why else do you travel to Minnesota to talk to his friends unless you’re doing it to push the “Mauer would never leave Minnesota for more money” story along?  What will the story look like if the Twins decide to lowball him and he bolts for Boston next year?  Will we still hear about his ranch, his video games and his Double-Doubles, or will we hear more about Joe Mauer, Inc., moving to the East Coast?

For what it’s worth I think he will stay in Minnesota, but if he does it will almost certainly be because it makes good business sense for him, not because of some inherent goodness in him that renders the same considerations every other ballplayer makes somehow irrelevant. 

Rick Ankiel drank vodka before a start to deal with the yips

9 Apr 2000: Rick Ankiel #66 of the St. Louis Cardinals winds back to pitch the ball during the game against the Milwaukee Brweers at the Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals defeated the Brewers 11-2. Mandatory Credit: Elsa Hasch  /Allsport
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The story of Rick Ankiel is well known by now. He was a phenom pitcher who burst onto the scene with the Cardinals in 1999 and into the 2000 season as one of the top young talents in the game. Then, in the 2000 playoffs, he melted down. He got the yips. Whatever you want to call it, he lost the ability to throw strikes and his pitching career was soon over. He came back, however, against all odds, and remade his career as a solid outfielder.

It’s inspirational and incredible. But there is a lot more to the story that we’ve ever known. We will soon, however, as Ankiel is coming out with a book. Today he took to the airwaves and shared some about it. Including some amazing stuff:

On drinking in his first start after the famous meltdown in Game One of the 2000 National League division series against the Braves:

“Before that game…I’m scared to death. I know I have no chance. Feeling the pressure of all that, right before the game I get a bottle of vodka. I just started drinking vodka. Low and behold, it kind of tamed the monster, and I was able to do what I wanted. I’m sitting on the bench feeling crazy I have to drink vodka to pitch through this. It worked for that game. (I had never drank before a game before). It was one of those things like the yipps, the monster, the disease…it didn’t fight fair so I felt like I wasn’t going to fight fair either.”

Imagine spending your whole life getting to the pinnacle of your career. Then imagine it immediately disintegrating. And then imagine having to go out and do it again in front of millions. It’s almost impossible for anyone to contemplate and, as such, it’s hard to judge almost anything Ankiel did in response to that when he was 21 years-old. That Ankiel got through that and made a career for himself is absolutely amazing. It’s a testament to his drive and determination.

 

Justin Turner talks “Easy D”

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 22:  Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers warms up prior to game six of the National League Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on October 22, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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A couple of weeks ago our president wrote one of his more . . . vexing tweets. He was talking about immigration when he whipped out the phrase . . . “Easy D”:

No one was quite sure what he meant by Easy D. Was it the older brother of N.W.A.’s founder? The third sequel to that Emma Stone movie from a few years back? So many questions!

Baseball Twitter had fun with it, though, with a lot of people wondering how they could work it in casually to their commentary:

It wasn’t a scout who did it, but twelve days after that, a player obliged Mr. McCullough:

I have no more idea what Turner was talking about with that than Trump was. We’ll have to wait for the full story in the L.A. Times. But I am going to assume Turner was doing McCullough a solid with that one rather than commenting on the president’s tweet. Either way, I’m glad he made the effort.

And before you ask: yes, it’s a slow news day.