Is Lew Wolff about to get what he wants?

Leave a comment

It’s been eleven months since Bud Selig announced that the Athletics’ future would be decided by a committee. Specifically, a committee that would determine whether Oakland remained viable, whether San Jose would be better and what in the world to do about the fact that the Giants claim Santa Clara County as their territory.  That committee is expected to complete its work this week and issue it’s report to the Budster. Monte Poole of the Mercury-News thinks its conclusions were forgone:

In the 11 months that have
passed since Selig convened a committee to examine future prospects for
a ballpark in Oakland, Wolff has been about as patient as his
superficial exasperation will allow. He wants it known that he doesn’t
understand why it’s taken so long for his college fraternity brother to
abide by a basic fraternal oath: Thou shall always find a way to “hook
up” his frat brother — even if the Giants claim territorial rights.

it takes time for the commish to pull this off without making it look
as if the plot was hatched years ago, in the private room of a
steakhouse, sealed with the secret frat bro handshake.

Poole goes on to note that Selig has long been on record of (a) helping Wolff; and (b) dissing Oakland, so it’s not like Wolff isn’t going to ultimately get what he wants here.

Of course, if it was that simple this would have been done months ago. The fact that the City of San Francisco and the Giants have grown increasingly vocal about their claims to San Jose complicates things, and it would not surprise me at all if the bulk of the commission’s time has been spent trying to figure out the best way to buy them off as opposed to looking at surveys of ballpark sites in Oakland and San Jose.

Ultimately I think this gets done. It makes too much sense for Oakland to be in San Jose, the non-Giant owners probably agree, and ultimately the Giants — like the Orioles before them — will get some kind of payoff to agree to a the move.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.