Dayton Moore loves cliches, still doesn't get it

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Royals pitchers and catchers reported to spring training this morning and general manager Dayton Moore had this to say about the team’s offseason moves:

I love the moves that we’ve made this offseason. We wanted to get more athletic, and we wanted more team speed. Guys who could play better defense. And for a little over $8 million, we’ve added Chris Getz, Josh Fields, Rick [Ankiel], Scott Podsednik, Jason Kendall, Noel Arguelles and Brian Anderson.



All of those guys are very athletic and defensive-oriented players. They’re baseball players in the sense that they come to play. They’re winners. They’ve got great reputations in the game of being competitors. We like the moves a great deal.

I’m certainly not going to fault a GM for saying that he likes his own offseason moves, but all that other stuff is mostly nonsense and similar to what we’ve heard from Moore each spring since he got the job in 2006.
– “We wanted to get more athletic, and we wanted more team speed.”
– “They’re baseball players in the sense that they come to play.”
– “They’re winners.”
– “They’ve got great reputations in the game of being competitors.”
Just to be clear, he’s talking about Jason Kendall, Scott Podsednik, Rick Ankiel, Chris Getz, Brian Anderson, and Josh Fields. Meanwhile, he seems not to care a whole lot about getting on base or hitting for power, and doesn’t seem to realize that all those cliches about supposed intangibles don’t really matter when the team is terrible.
Kansas City has averaged 99 losses per season since their last winning record in 2003, and I can assure you that not having enough speedy, athletic winners who come to play and are competitors hasn’t been the problem.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.