You can get dibs on Cubs tickets if you want to pay more

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Money don’t get everything it’s true, but what it don’t get . . . wait, I think it gets pretty much everything these days:

On Monday, fans will be able to buy tickets to every Cubs home game, but at a premium of 20 percent over the face value, or 15
percent if they pay with a MasterCard. The MasterCard First Chance
Presale will last until Thursday and include an undisclosed percentage
of the pool of the Cubs’ single-game tickets.

On Friday, any remaining tickets will be sold at face value (with the usual assortment of fees).

While I sometimes pretend to be a big commie I don’t have any problem with rich people being rich.  Whether their assets came from the sweat of their brow or accident of birth, good for them. Indeed, I wouldn’t mind joining their ranks someday. You know, just to see how it feels.

But I do lament the fact that we live in a world where access to money has almost completely replaced the effort of standing on line and waiting when it comes to getting dibs on anything worth having. While it may be perfectly economically rational for access to stuff — rather than just the stuff itself — to have a price, there was something nice and democratic about everyone having to line up together at the bank, the post office, the voting booth or the box office back in the day.

Oh well, if anyone needs me I’ll be at the automat eating my luncheon and writing pamphlets  for my WPA job.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

Justin K. Aller/Getty Images
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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. lays out to make a great catch in deep right-center field

Adam Glanzman/Getty Images
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Cubs center fielder Albert Almora, Jr. robbed Giants first baseman Brandon Belt of at least a double in the top of the first inning of Monday’s game at Wrigley Field. Almora completely left his feet to catch the ball before landing just shy of the warning track.

The Giants took the early lead two batters prior to Belt’s at-bat as Joe Panik hit a solo home run to center field.