What should the Yankees do with Jesus Montero?

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Jesus Montero.jpgThe Daily News had an in-depth article about Yankees’ catching prospect Jesus Montero over the weekend. The focus follows the standard Montero storyline: kid can hit a ton, but his defense is lacking. As you might expect, there’s lots of stuff in there about bruised arms from ball-in-the-dirt drills, speculation as to whether he can hack it at first base, etc. Good story.

And while this is probably no surprise to Yankees fans and prospect hawks, I was unaware of how much catching depth the Bombers have in the minors:

The Yankees have so much catching depth in their minor-league system
that, as good as Jesus Montero is, he may not be Jorge Posada’s
eventual replacement. Four of the Yanks’ top eight prospects, according
to Baseball America, are catchers.

Maybe it’s Austin Romine, last year’s Florida State League player of the year who Baseball America tabbed as the Yankees’ No. 2 prospect behind Montero. Or Gary Sanchez (No. 7), who signed for $3 million as an international free agent, or J.R. Murphy (No. 8). Maybe it’s 19-year-old Kyle Higashoika.

“I’ve never seen so many good young catchers together,” says Julio
Mosquera, the Yankees’ minor-league catching coordinator. “I tell these
guys, ‘The sky is the limit for you.’ “

There’s not much more valuable in baseball than a good young catcher, and though the Yankees have been forfeiting draft picks due to free agent signings and picking late for years, that kind of depth could be plenty to keep the talent flowing into the Bronx for years. Indeed, this winter it was widely reported that the Yankees offered Montero for Roy Halladay.

Whether that simply wasn’t rich enough for the Jays or whether they simply didn’t want to trade Doc within the division is unclear, but you can bet that at some point someone is going to trade the Yankees an expensive stud veteran for Montero or one of the other prospects.

Let’s end spring training now, you guys

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There’s a saying that goes “nothing good ever happens after 2AM.” It can also be said that nothing good ever happens after, say, week 5 or 6 of spring training.

Today, for instance, are a lot of inconsequential games. Those are neutral. Then there are a rash of these sorts of incidents which just went down today, all of which are bad:

Archer seems to be OK for now. Moncada walked off his thing and went back into the game. We’re still waiting to hear on Bumgarner and Ichiro. If there is anything serious with them we’ll update as we learn things.

But really, guys: Spring Training is too long. Even in a year like this one, when it’s a tad shorter than usual because of an early start to the regular season. Everyone who was gonna get their timing down well enough to make a big league roster has already done so. If someone isn’t healthy and in playing shape now, they’re not gonna be six days from now for Opening Day. The cake, as they say, is baked.

All that can happen is possessed-by-the-devil baseballs attacking unsuspecting players and injuring them in meaningless exhibitions. Let’s cease all baseball now until the regular season starts. Out of an abundance of caution.