The Rangers have failed to make deferred compensation payments for months

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The biggest reason the sale of the Texas Rangers still hasn’t gone final is because the team’s creditors are angry that all kinds of cash is coming off the top of the deal to go to Tom Hicks and others, leaving less for them.  One of the “others,” SBJ reports today, is a deferred compensation fund that the Rangers are required to maintain pursuant to the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Yeah, they’ve been defaulting on that:

The Texas Rangers have been
in violation of baseball’s collective-bargaining agreement since at least last
season for failing to pay $39.55 million into a deferred compensation fund,
according to a letter sent on Oct. 22, 2009, by MLB executive vice president
Rob Manfred to the bidders for the ballclub. The MLBPA is aware of the
situation, Manfred wrote in the letter, and the union’s executive director,
Michael Weiner confirmed, in response to SportsBusiness Journal questions.

Weiner confirms that the team has not yet defaulted on any specific deferred compensation obligation (i.e. all players who have such arrangements have gotten all of their checks) but a violation is a violation, and if and when Chuck Greenberg gets the team, he’s going to have to replenish that fund with a cash payment.

There’s that word again. “Cash.”  The thing that some have reported this deal is short on. The thing that is still keeping the creditors from signing off on the sale.  You read stuff like this and you can’t help but wonder whether Greenberg has enough on the table right now.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.