The Rangers have failed to make deferred compensation payments for months

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The biggest reason the sale of the Texas Rangers still hasn’t gone final is because the team’s creditors are angry that all kinds of cash is coming off the top of the deal to go to Tom Hicks and others, leaving less for them.  One of the “others,” SBJ reports today, is a deferred compensation fund that the Rangers are required to maintain pursuant to the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Yeah, they’ve been defaulting on that:

The Texas Rangers have been
in violation of baseball’s collective-bargaining agreement since at least last
season for failing to pay $39.55 million into a deferred compensation fund,
according to a letter sent on Oct. 22, 2009, by MLB executive vice president
Rob Manfred to the bidders for the ballclub. The MLBPA is aware of the
situation, Manfred wrote in the letter, and the union’s executive director,
Michael Weiner confirmed, in response to SportsBusiness Journal questions.

Weiner confirms that the team has not yet defaulted on any specific deferred compensation obligation (i.e. all players who have such arrangements have gotten all of their checks) but a violation is a violation, and if and when Chuck Greenberg gets the team, he’s going to have to replenish that fund with a cash payment.

There’s that word again. “Cash.”  The thing that some have reported this deal is short on. The thing that is still keeping the creditors from signing off on the sale.  You read stuff like this and you can’t help but wonder whether Greenberg has enough on the table right now.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.