Diving into the depths: Kansas City Royals

Leave a comment

This is part of a 30-article series looking at each team’s depth chart headed into spring training.
Kansas City Royals
Rotation
1. Zack Greinke
2. Gil Meche
3. Brian Bannister
4. Luke Hochevar
5. Kyle Davies
6. Robinson Tejeda
7. Kyle Farnsworth
8. Jorge Campillo
9. Bruce Chen
10. Anthony Lerew
11. Brad Thompson
12. Blake Johnson
13. Blake Wood
14. Aaron Crow
15. Noel Arguelles
Bannister and Davies are due a combined $4.1 million this year, so both figure to have spots in the rotation. Still, it’d be a shame if Tejeda is left out after going 3-1 with a 2.84 ERA in six starts at the end of last season. He has more upside than the three pitchers above him. Odds are that he’ll start off in the bullpen and then get another look as a starter come May or June.
Bullpen
1. Joakim Soria
2. Carlos Rosa
3. Kyle Farnsworth
4. Juan Cruz
5. Robinson Tejeda
6. Roman Colon
7. Brad Thompson
8. Matt Herges
9. Victor Marte
10. Dusty Hughes
11. Bruce Chen
12. Philip Humber
13. Jorge Campillo
14. Anthony Lerew
15. Edgar Osuna
16. John Parrish
17. Josh Rupe
18. Bryan Bullington
19. Adam Bostick
20. Francisco Rosario
Unless either Farnsworth or Tejeda can win a place in the rotation, the Royals would seem to have six spots spoken for here. I’m putting Thompson and Herges next, but the team doesn’t currently have a lefty penciled into the bullpen. Hughes, Chen, Osuna and Parrish could compete for the role unless the team signs a veteran.


Catcher
1. Jason Kendall
2. Brayan Pena
3. Vance Wilson
4. Edwin Bellorin
First base
1. Billy Butler
2. Wilson Betemit
3. Kila Ka’aihue
4. Josh Fields
5. Scott Thorman
Second base
1. Alberto Callaspo
2. Chris Getz
3. Mike Aviles
4. Willie Bloomquist
5. Jeff Bianchi
Third base
1. Alex Gordon
2. Josh Fields
3. Alberto Callaspo
4. Willie Bloomquist
5. Wilson Betemit
6. Mario Lisson
Shortstop
1. Yuniesky Betancourt
2. Willie Bloomquist
3. Mike Aviles
4. Mario Lisson
Getz’s defense might get him the nod over Callaspo at second base, though the Royals would be benching their second-best hitter from 2009 if they went that route. If they truly feel that strongly about Callaspo’s defense, they’d still probably be better off starting him at DH over Jose Guillen.
Left field
1. Scott Podsednik
2. Willie Bloomquist
3. Brian Anderson
4. Jordan Parraz
5. Buck Coats
Center field
1. Rick Ankiel
2. Willie Bloomquist
3. Brian Anderson
4. Mitch Maier
5. Jarrod Dyson
Right field
1. David DeJesus
2. Jose Guillen
3. Willie Bloomquist
4. Brian Anderson
5. Josh Fields
Designated hitter
1. Jose Guillen
2. Josh Fields
3. Alberto Callaspo
4. Wilson Betemit
5. Kila Ka’aihue
It’s a lineup that includes one sure thing in DeJesus, an emerging star in Butler and six question marks. And Kendall. Bloomquist is the only player guaranteed a bench spot. Another will go to Pena or Wilson as Kendall’s backup. That leaves two openings for the loser in the Callaspo-Getz competition, Fields, Aviles, Betemit, Anderson and Maier. I’d say Getz and Fields have the advantages there, but if Aviles shows he’s healthy after Tommy John surgery, a Callaspo trade will become a strong possibility.

Watch: Mike Trout ties MLB record with his 25th home run

Getty Images
1 Comment

It was only a matter of time before Mike Trout courted another all-time record, and on Saturday, he found himself in elite company with his 25th and 26th home runs of the season. He put the Angels on the board with a 429-foot blast in the first inning, depositing an 0-1 fastball from the Orioles’ Kevin Gausman into the left field bleachers:

In the third inning, with the Angels up 2-1, Trout returned to tack on another insurance run. He targeted Gausman’s slider for his second solo shot of the evening and cleared the center field fence with a 418-footer to bring his total to 26 home runs on the year.

Trout has mashed at a staggering .339/.471/.596 clip since his return from the disabled list last month, and Saturday’s totals helped mark his sixth consecutive season with at least 25 home runs. That’s a record few have matched before their age-26 season; in fact, only Hall of Fame sluggers Eddie Mathews and Frank Robinson have ever pulled it off.

Assuming he continues to rake in hits and plate appearances over the last six weeks of the regular season — and there’s nothing to indicate that he won’t — Trout is in line to join elite company of a different kind. The 26-year-old entered Saturday’s game with a 206 OPS+ (park-adjusted on-base plus slugging). According to MLB.com’s Matt Kelly, that means Trout’s hitting at a better clip than the average Major League player by a full 106 percent. Should he finish the year with a 200 OPS+ and 502 plate appearances or better, he’ll be the first player to do so since Barry Bonds obliterated the competition with his 263 OPS+ in 2004.

Blue Jays acquire Tom Koehler from Marlins

Getty Images
1 Comment

The Blue Jays acquired right-hander Tom Koehler from the Marlins in exchange for minor league right-hander Osman Gutierrez and cash considerations, the clubs announced Saturday. Koehler is in his sixth year with the Marlins and stands to make $5.75 million in 2017. He’ll be arbitration eligible in 2018 and is set to enter free agency by 2019.

The 31-year-old right-hander struggled to a 7.92 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 over 55 2/3 innings with Miami in 2017. He was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in late July, where he rebounded with a 1-1 record in seven starts and whittled his ERA down to a 1.67 mark. The Blue Jays have yet to establish Koehler’s role within their organization, but are hoping to see a turnaround from the righty when he breaks back into the big leagues.

Gutierrez, 22, was assigned to Single-A Greensboro on Saturday. He has yet to find his footing in the minors, and exited a 78-inning stint with Single-A Lansing after racking up a career-worst 7.85 ERA and 8.2 SO/9. His lack of control is particularly alarming, with a 6.2 BB/9 that dwarfs the 2.0+ BB/9 of seasons past, but he still has plenty of time to figure out his mechanics before reaching the Show.