Diving into the depths: Colorado Rockies

Leave a comment

This is part of a 30-article series looking at each team’s depth chart headed into spring training.
Colorado Rockies
Rotation
1. Ubaldo Jimenez
2. Aaron Cook
3. Jorge De La Rosa
4. Jason Hammel
5. Jeff Francis
6. Jhoulys Chacin
7. Greg Smith
8. Tim Redding
9. Franklin Morales
10. Greg Reynolds
11. Samuel Deduno
12. Chaz Roe
13. Christian Freidrich
Colorado’s rotation is a strength, even though neither De La Rosa nor Hammel can be counted on to be as effective again. I really like the depth. If Chacin’s command improves a bit, he’ll fit in nicely as an injury replacement, and Smith, who was effective for the A’s as a rookie in 2008 before arriving in the Matt Holliday trade and missing most of last year, could prove to be pretty good insurance.
Bullpen
1. Huston Street
2. Rafael Betancourt
3. Manuel Corpas
4. Franklin Morales
5. Matt Daley
6. Matt Belisle
7. Juan Rincon
8. Tim Redding
9. Justin Speier
10. Jhoulys Chacin
11. Randy Flores
12. Casey Weathers
13. Jimmy Gobble
14. Shane Lindsay
15. Al Albuquerque
16. Esmil Rogers
The Rockies made an attempt to sign free agent Kevin Gregg, but they should be OK as is in the bullpen. Five spots appear to be locked up, and there are plenty of veterans around to battle for the two openings. Plus, Taylor Buchholz could return from Tommy John surgery in June.


Catcher
1. Chris Iannetta
2. Miguel Olivo
3. Paul Phillips
4. Paul Lo Duca
5. Michael McKenry
First base
1. Todd Helton
2. Jason Giambi
3. Brad Hawpe
4. Ian Stewart
Second base
1. Clint Barmes
2. Melvin Mora
3. Eric Young Jr.
4. Omar Quintanilla
Third base
1. Ian Stewart
2. Melvin Mora
3. Omar Quintanilla
4. Jonathan Herrera
Shortstop
1. Troy Tulowitzki
2. Clint Barmes
3. Jonathan Herrera
4. Omar Quintanilla
Mora was an interesting choice as the new utilityman, given that he’s 38 and he hasn’t started a game at a position other than third base since 2003. Still, he’s a nice complement to Stewart, and the Rockies do have the option of going to Barmes at shortstop in the event of an injury to Tulowitzki. If that happens, they’d probably be better off with Young at second than with Mora.
Left field
1. Carlos Gonzalez
2. Seth Smith
3. Ryan Spilborghs
4. Eric Young Jr.
5. Jay Payton
6. Matt Miller
Center field
1. Dexter Fowler
2. Carlos Gonzalez
3. Ryan Spilborghs
4. Eric Young Jr.
5. Jay Payton
Right field
1. Brad Hawpe
2. Ryan Spilborghs
3. Carlos Gonzalez
Rather than trade Hawpe or Spilborghs, the Rockies opted to keep all five of their outfielders. My suspicion is that the Rockies would be better off with Gonzalez in center and Smith in left against right-handers, but Smith will probably take a backseat initially. They’ll probably go with a bench of Smith, Spilborghs, Olivo, Mora and a second utilityman. Quintanilla could be the choice, since the Rockies won’t want to carry someone who would be better off getting at-bats in Triple-A.

Marlins, Mariners are “fairly close” on a trade for David Phelps

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Jon Morosi reports that the Mariners and the Marlins are “fairly close” on a trade that would send reliever David Phelps to Seattle. Earlier Ken Rosenthal and others reported that the sides were talking, but that a deal was not imminent.

Phelps, 30, had a fantastic 2016 season, posting a 2.28 ERA in 64 games while striking out 11.8 batters per nine innings. He’s not been as strong this year, but he’s still been a solid setup man, posting a 3.45 ERA in 44 games while striking out 51 batters and walking 21 in 47 innings. He throws in the mid-90s and induces grounders. Basically everything you want in a reliever, right?

The Mariners could probably use rotation help more than bullpen help, but solid innings are solid innings at one point and improving your pen takes some of the pressure off of your rotation.

 

Corey Seager has more homers than any other shortstop in Los Angeles Dodgers history

Getty Images
2 Comments

Corey Sager homered in the Dodgers’ win over the White Sox last night. It was his 45th career homer, 44 of which have come while playing shortstop. While that’s great given that the guy has only played in 270 games, it’s not a lot of homers in an absolute sense. Thousands of players have more homers than that, obviously. Baseball has been around for a long time!

But it’s enough to set a record. A Los Angeles Dodgers record, specifically, for the most homers from a shortstop. It puts Seager past Rafael Furcal, who hit 43 while wearing Dodger blue. The record for the franchise, including Brooklyn, is Pee Wee Reese, who hit 122.

It seems astounding that no other Dodgers shortstop has hit more than 44 homers in the nearly 60 years since the club has been in Los Angeles, but it’s true. If you had asked me before I saw the factoid mentioned on Twitter I would’ve bet my life that Bill Russell would’ve had more. Not because he had any power — he was, in fact, one of the more punchless players of his era — but because he simply played in L.A. so long, logging 1,746 games at short for Walt Alston and Tommy Lasorda. Nope. He only hit 46 in his 18-year career, with a handful of those coming as an outfielder. His season high is seven. Seager has hit seven homers in May of his rookie season.

Oh well, you learn something new every day.