SABR is giving away a free baseball book

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As someone who gets all kinds of cool stuff from being a Society for American Baseball Research member I feel it’s my duty to let everyone know that SABR is now offering a PDF version of the annual “Emerald Guide to Baseball” absolutely free to members and non-members alike.
Edited by Gary Gillette and Pete Palmer, the 570-page book contains … well, I’ll let them tell you:

Developed in the spirit of the classic guides published by the Sporting News, Spalding, and Reach, The Emerald Guide includes all pitching, hitting, and fielding statistics for every player active in the major and minor leagues during 2009.



Other features include team histories, up-to-date team contact information and schedules, an extensive Year in Review essay, team day-by-day game logs, All-Star Game box score and play-by play, post-season box scores and play-by-play, transactions, debuts, first-year player draft, and major and minor league necrology.

The print version costs $24.95, so by downloading the free PDF version you’re basically making money. And you also help SABR accomplish its goal of “providing as much information as possible to as many people as possible.” Seriously, that’s their goal. Great organization, great product, and FREE STUFF.

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.