Let's start the day with something non-controversial: racism

Leave a comment

Moshe Mandel at TYU wants to know if it’s not curious that some writers assume that Felix Hernandez will be more likely to become complacent and lazy now that he has a big contract than Justin Verlander will.  Or whether there is any rational explanation for thinking that Dustin Pedroia “cares more” about his team and winning than Robinson Cano.  What’s really at play here, Mandel wonders:

Baseball fans are commonly exposed to this sort of dichotomy, in which
white players are often presented as gritty and do everything they can
to maximize their talents, while minority players are “athletic” and
“smooth,” and “make it look easy out there.” The successes of white
players are attributed to effort, while the successes of non-white
players are explained by inherent ability. Failures by minorities
players are often explained by pointing to a lack of effort. Failures
by white players have a way of occasionally being rationalized away or
even forgotten.

The scientific name for this is aversive racism, and it’s pretty rampant. Orlando Hudson is fast. The white guy is a “possession receiver.” The black leftfielder is “gifted.” The white second baseman is scrappy and likes to get his uniform dirty. And as Mandel points out, what is the deal with Paul O’Neill not getting any crap for not running out those ground balls in Game 3 of the 1999 World Series?

Thought provoking stuff, definitely worth a click-through to TYU this morning.

Report: Nationals to interview Alex Cora for managerial position

Getty Images
1 Comment

Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reports that the Nationals will ask to speak with Astros’ bench coach Alex Cora after the American League Championship Series concludes on Saturday. This comes on the heels of the news that club manager Dusty Baker will not be returning to the team in 2018.

Cora, 42, has some experience in the Nationals’ organization. He played for the Nats during his last big league stint in 2011, batting .224/.287/.276 through 91 games before announcing his retirement in the spring of 2012. Per Cafardo, he was also offered a player development gig with the club, but has not appeared in any kind of official role with them since his days as a major league infielder. While he’s been lauded for his leadership skills and strong clubhouse presence, he hasn’t acquired any managerial experience since his retirement, save for a handful of games with the Astros where he filled in for A.J. Hinch.

Despite the appeal of having a familiar face in the dugout, the Nationals aren’t the only ones eyeing Cora. The Astros’ coach has already interviewed with the Tigers, Mets and Red Sox this month. Boston appears to be the current favorite to land him and according to at least one source, may even announce his hiring in advance of the World Series next Tuesday.