Dynamic ticket pricing is a good thing

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Nelson Algren said it best: Never play cards with a man called Doc, never eat at a place called
Mom’s, never sleep with a woman whose troubles are worse than your own, and never start spewing stuff about economics when you obviously don’t know what you’re talking about.  Here’s SF Weekly’s Joe Eskenazi on the Giants’ new dynamic ticket pricing:

. . . it just seems downright wrong that you should be
made to pay more for a baseball game because it’s a “great day for baseball.” It
seems exploitative that you should be made to cough up extra dollars
when Tim Lincecum is on the mound; will we be given a deep discount
when Zito is pitching or Pablo Sandoval takes a day off? Further following the airline model,
will we be charged extra for using the restroom? Do clean seats cost
more? Do I have to pay extra to stay out of the all-felon, all-drunk,
all-jerks talking loudly about work on their iPhone section?

Baseball writer/economics professor J.C. Bradbury schools him:

I’m not really all that sympathetic. People are paying a price for a
product they value at that price or higher, I’m not seeing a downside.
You used to be able to buy something you valued more for less, and now
you have to pay a higher price that is still equivalent to or less than
what you value the product. And when the product is a baseball game,
cry me a river in the name of social justice.

OK, that was the fun part, not the schooling part. For that you’ll have to click through and read why it makes perfect sense — for everyone — for teams to do the dynamic pricing thing.

Report: Orioles interested in Jarrod Dyson

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Free agent outfielder Jarrod Dyson is still a possible target for the Orioles, according to Roch Kubatko of MASNsports.com. The outfielder has received limited interest after entering free agency this season, due in part to the season-ending sports hernia surgery he underwent last September. To that end, Kubatko says, the team has verified his medicals and no red flags appear to have surfaced so far.

Dyson, 33, managed a modest .251/.324/.350 batting line, five home runs and 28 stolen bases in 390 plate appearances for the Mariners last year. He didn’t overwhelm the competition at the plate, particularly during an injury-riddled second half, but still showed himself capable of maintaining the speed and defense that have become his calling cards over the last five seasons. Kubatko notes that while Dyson doesn’t appear to be seeking an everyday role again in 2018, he could be a “useful player” for Baltimore if he remains healthy.

The Giants have also tossed their hats in the ring for Dyson this winter, going so far as to call him their primary non-Lorenzo Cain candidate. Nothing is close to being finalized, however, and ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that both Dyson and the Giants are still talking to other interested parties. The Orioles, too, are exploring alternatives to Dyson, and are rumored to be in talks with an anonymous right fielder who could conceivably platoon in right field and help provide depth behind Adam Jones in center.