Dynamic ticket pricing is a good thing

Leave a comment

Nelson Algren said it best: Never play cards with a man called Doc, never eat at a place called
Mom’s, never sleep with a woman whose troubles are worse than your own, and never start spewing stuff about economics when you obviously don’t know what you’re talking about.  Here’s SF Weekly’s Joe Eskenazi on the Giants’ new dynamic ticket pricing:

. . . it just seems downright wrong that you should be
made to pay more for a baseball game because it’s a “great day for baseball.” It
seems exploitative that you should be made to cough up extra dollars
when Tim Lincecum is on the mound; will we be given a deep discount
when Zito is pitching or Pablo Sandoval takes a day off? Further following the airline model,
will we be charged extra for using the restroom? Do clean seats cost
more? Do I have to pay extra to stay out of the all-felon, all-drunk,
all-jerks talking loudly about work on their iPhone section?

Baseball writer/economics professor J.C. Bradbury schools him:

I’m not really all that sympathetic. People are paying a price for a
product they value at that price or higher, I’m not seeing a downside.
You used to be able to buy something you valued more for less, and now
you have to pay a higher price that is still equivalent to or less than
what you value the product. And when the product is a baseball game,
cry me a river in the name of social justice.

OK, that was the fun part, not the schooling part. For that you’ll have to click through and read why it makes perfect sense — for everyone — for teams to do the dynamic pricing thing.

Report: Orioles interested in Alex Cobb

Getty Images
Leave a comment

MLB Network’s Jon Morosi reports that the Orioles have interest in free agent right-hander Alex Cobb, who rejected his one-year, $17.4 million qualifying offer from the Rays earlier this week. Cobb was most recently linked to the Cubs, who reportedly reached out to his agent during the GM Meetings and garnered mutual interest from the righty, but nothing appears to be set in stone yet.

Cobb, 30, completed his sixth season with the Rays in 2017. He went 12-10 in 29 starts and turned in a respectable 3.66 ERA, 6.4 SO/9 and career-best 2.2 BB/9 in 179 1/3 innings. Despite losing a couple of weeks to turf toe, he remained healthy for most of the year and showed no signs of the elbow issues that robbed him of the majority of his 2015-2016 campaigns.

It’s still fairly early for any deals to come to fruition, but Morosi notes that the Orioles seem to be focused on bulking up their rotation during the first few months of the offseason. It’ll take more than a healthy Alex Cobb to right that ship, however: Orioles’ starters earned a collective 5.70 ERA and 5.5 fWAR in 2017, good for worst and fourth-worst marks in the league, respectively. Behind Kevin Gausman and Dylan Bundy (and perhaps Gabriel Ynoa/Miguel Castro), they still need three viable starters to compete in 2018. Whether or not they can afford to spring for a single starter with Cobb’s price tag (four years, $48 million, per MLB Trade Rumors) remains to be seen.