Dave Eiland: Joba's training wheels are off

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Joba.jpgYankees’ pitching coach Dave Eiland confirmed yesterday that “The Joba Rules” are officially history:

“He’s just going to go out and pitch and he’ll be the one who’ll
dictate when he comes out as far as getting hit or getting tired or
losing his stuff. He’s not going to have any restrictions, so Joe (Girardi) and I are
not going to have to go into the game thinking, ‘Oh, he’s got 85
pitches or six innings or whatever comes first.’ We don’t have to game
plan it out. The kid gloves are off, and he’s just going to go out and
pitch and he knows that and he’s going to come in and be all geared up
to win that job, as are the other guys. Competition should bring out
the best in everyone.”

Eiland added that he believed that the pitch and innings counts and kid gloves hindered Chamberlain’s performance as a starter, which is a drum I and many others have been banging for some time.

As for the competition Eiland mentions, the other day a commenter here — whose name I’m forgetting, sorry — made one of those points that are so obvious that I can’t believe people don’t say it more often: if the Yankees truly intended to make Chamberlain a reliever, why would they have stuck to the Joba Rules as slavishly as they did these past few years?

Indeed, it wouldn’t shock me if Brian Cashman had some super secret notebook in his office which has Chamberlain was already written down as the fifth starter.  In permanent marker.

Phillies, Jake Arrieta having a “dialogue”

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No, not like a Socratic dialogue, in which each side, in a mostly cooperative, but intellectually confrontational manner interrogate one another as a means of testing assertions and finding truths, though that would be an AMAZING thing for baseball players and teams to do. Rather, low-level talks about possible interest in Jake Arrieta, baseball free agent.

Arrieta is probably the top free agent still available, now that Yu Darvish, J.D. Martinez and Eric Hosmer have signed. Philly has money — it’s a big market — and could use a pitcher, but Jon Heyman, who, much like Plato did for Socrates, reported the dialogue, says they’re not looking to go long term with anyone.

It may make sense for Arrieta to take a so-called “pillow contract” and come back on the market in a year, but if he’s willing to accept a one-year deal, there are a lot of teams other than Philly who may offer one, and you’d have to figure Arrieta would prefer to pitch for a team more likely to contend.

Dialogues are cool, though. You should go have one over lunch.