What are the Yankees going to do with Jeter, Rivera and Girardi?

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The New York Post says that the Yankees aren’t talking extension with Jeter, Rivera or Girardi.  This is not a surprise, really, as the Yankees have a pretty solid track record of not negotiating with their own free agents until their deals actually expire. Such an approach makes perfect sense for them, of course, because the one reason you try to lock up guys before they hit the market — to keep from having to fight off higher bidders — is not exactly a concern in New York.

Of course the Post does its damndest to try and make it an issue by slapping a quasi-inflammatory headline on the story and playing a breathless what-if game, but what else do you expect from the Post? The day they stop trying to make mountains out of molehills is the day I start worrying. But setting aside the timing and dramatics of it all, what do you do with these guys if you’re the Yankees?

I think you have to treat Girardi like a cog. Sure, if he manages another nice no-drama year and the Yankees make a good showing of it you offer him another year or two in the interests of consistency. But I’ve not seen anyone argue that the difference between success or failure in Yankeeland is whatever managerial genius Girardi possesses.  Is he really telling Derek Jeter or Alex Rodriguez anything they don’t already know about how to play baseball? He’s Ralph Houk to Joe Torre’s Casey Stengel, isn’t he? Some people may argue that having him as a lame duck manager is a distraction. I think that locking him up for multiple years would create a much larger distraction later when the team wants to fire him.

Rivera is a toughie.  He’s still awesome. He’s the best ever at what he does. He’s also 40, though, and while we all want to see him pitch forever, he won’t.  If he’s still dominant this year I think you’re obligated to give him a contract with some risk attached (i.e. multiple years), knowing that you may eat most of it, because how do you say no to a legend who’s still got it?  Likewise, if the wheels fall off in 2010 it’s not going to be too terribly hard to say “Look Mo, we love you, but this is probably it.”  The real hard thing is going to be if he falters this season but is still generally OK. Like, if he becomes Bobby Jenks or Chad Qualls or someone like that. Superficially he’ll still look like an elite closer, but in reality he won’t be worth that kind of commitment.  Such a dynamic could make for a very, very thorny fall and winter.

Jeter is kind of a no-brainer. He’s going to get a big fat contract that pays him just as much if not a little more than the $21 million he makes now over fewer years. Everyone will know the moment it’s signed that the back end of it is going to be ugly and no one will really care because he’s Derek Jeter.  If a situation presents itself in which he’s making $22-25 million and can’t hit his weight, he and the team will get creative and turn his money into some lifetime contract, he’ll retire and become the greatest ambassador the Yankees ever had.  The details aren’t important. What’s important is that both the Yankees and Jeter have zero desire to see the Captain in any other uniform, and no matter how it’s dealt with, it won’t happen.

Ultimately there will be an inverse relationship between the amount of ink that is spilled over these three guys’ contract status and how difficult the Yankees’ decisions with respect to these guys ultimately will be.  We’ll hear about Jeter’s contract all season, but that gets done quickly. There will likewise be tons of hand-wringing “lame duck” articles regarding Girardi, but his deal (or termination) will only take about ten minutes more consideration than Jeter’s thing.

It’s Rivera’s situation that I’m planning on watching the closest, because if things break just wrong, it could be royal pain for the Yankees and Rivera and a total field day for the Post.

Casey McGehee signs one-year deal with Yomiuri Giants

DETROIT, MI - AUGUST 19: Casey McGehee #31 of the Detroit Tigers singles in the fourth inning of the game against the Boston Red Sox on August 19, 2016 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)
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Former Tigers infielder Casey McGehee has reportedly signed a one-year deal with the Yomiuri Giants of Nippon Professional Baseball, according to FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal.

It’s the fourth move the corner infielder has made in the last two seasons after seeing short-term stints with the Marlins, Giants and Tigers. He signed a minor league deal with the Tigers prior to the 2016 season, providing the club with some infield depth behind 24-year-old Nick Castellanos. When Castellanos hit the disabled list in August with a broken hand, McGehee was recalled from Triple-A Toledo for a 30-game stint and slashed .228/.260/.239 with one extra-base hit in 96 PA. His career batting line (.258/.317/.384 over eight seasons) isn’t too shabby, but his age and a long history of knee injuries puts a damper on his potential.

McGehee last appeared in the NPB circuit in 2013, when he signed a one-year, $1.5 million deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles. He spent the bulk of his season at the hot corner, batting an impressive .292/.396/.515 with 28 homers in 590 PA and appearing in the Eagles’ first and only championship run to date.

The deal comes with a club option for 2018, Rosenthal reports, though no figure has been specified.

Report: Dodgers could pursue three-year deal with Rich Hill

LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 18:  Rich Hill #44 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches in the first inning against the Chicago Cubs in game three of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium on October 18, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Free agent left-hander Rich Hill is rumored to be entertaining a three-year, $40+ million offer from the Dodgers, reports Peter Gammons. The Boston Globe’s Nick Cafardo corroborated the report, adding that Hill could receive somewhere between $46 and $48 million from his former team.

Hill, 36, pitched to a 2.12 ERA and 3.91 FIP in back-to-back stints with the Athletics and Dodgers in 2016. While a chronic case of blisters on his pitching hand limited the frequency of his starts, he still figures to be one of the most productive and noteworthy starting pitchers on the market this winter.

The Orioles, Yankees, Red Sox, Rangers and Astros have all been mentioned as potential suitors for the left-hander’s services, though Orioles’ GM Dan Duquette said the club has yet to make a play for Hill and ESPN’s Jim Bowden pointed out that the Red Sox are less involved in trade talks than other interested parties.