The Mets are lowering the centerfield fence

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The wall was sixteen feet high last year. Now it’s going to be eight feet, says Adam Rubin of the Daily News. David Wright is probably happy. Johan Santana is probably sad.  And so it goes.

But here’s a question: what are the Mets going to do for their other 81 games? After all, they were last in road home runs too. And as Rubin notes, more homers were hit per game in Citi Field than in Atlanta, San Diego, Los Angeles and St. Louis. Visitors hit more homers in Citi Field in 2009 than they did in Shea Stadium in 2008.

The Mets’ real problem last year was not their field. It was the can’t-hit-a-lick lineup they sent out there most days.  A lineup that was pressed into service due to a multitude of injuries. A lineup which everyone concedes was a worst case scenario.  A lineup, in other words, whose performance should not be the basis on which a team makes fundamental decisions about the configuration of their park.

But then again these are the Mets, and making sound, reasoned decisions just isn’t their bag, baby.

Video: Mets execute a bizarre double play against the Nationals

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Double plays come in an assortment of combinations, from the standard 6-4-3 combo to some more unusual patterns. During the Mets’ 5-3 win over the Nationals on Saturday, however, what made this double play strange was less the product of an unorthodox route and almost entirely due to an unexpected collision on the basepaths instead.

In the bottom of the fourth inning, with the Mets trailing 1-0, Zack Wheeler caught Jose Lobaton swinging for strike three. Mets’ backstop Travis d'Arnaud fired the ball to second base, where the ball slipped out of Asdrubal Cabrera‘s glove as Jayson Werth slid into the bag for a stolen base. Second baseman Neil Walker fielded the ball in shallow center field, then tossed it to third base, and Jose Reyes tagged Werth easily for the second out of the play.

The Mets complimented their defensive efforts with a strong showing at the plate, reclaiming the lead with three home runs from Michael Conforto and Jose Reyes to clinch their tenth win of the year.

Report: Adam Eaton to miss rest of the season with a torn ACL

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It’s been a miserable weekend for Nationals’ outfielder Adam Eaton, who stumbled over first base and injured his leg while running out an infield single in Friday’s 7-5 loss to the Mets. While the team officially placed the outfielder on the 10-day disabled list with a left knee strain on Saturday, FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reports that Eaton has been diagnosed with a torn ACL in his left knee and is expected to miss the remainder of the 2017 season. The team has yet to confirm the diagnosis or announce a definite timetable for the 28-year-old’s return, perhaps due to extended evaluations by Eaton’s orthopedic doctor:

The Nationals appear to have several outfield options with Eaton on the disabled list, though they have not pinned down a long-term solution. Center fielder Michael Taylor replaced Eaton on the field during the tail end of Friday’s game, and returned on Saturday to man center and bat second in the lineup. The club also promoted top outfield prospect Rafael Bautista, who slashed .291/.325/.354 with five doubles and a .680 OPS through 19 games in Triple-A Syracuse this season. He’ll assume Eaton’s roster spot and looks to be available for a backup role in the outfield going forward.