Some more changes coming to Wrigley Field

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Fractional ownership suites aren’t the only new things coming to Wrigley Field next year:

Cubs are following the lead of the Boston Red Sox, opening up the space
underneath the right-field bleachers for corporate pregame events, and
for bleacher fans who may want to come down during the game and watch
the action on flat-screen TVs.
pane of one-way glass will separate fans from the right-field batting
cage, allowing them to watch b.p. in the area that Guillen claims has
been a long-time haven for rats.

But wait, there’s more!

  • There
    will be a “30 percent overall increase in bathroom capacity” and improvements in the womens
    bathrooms. Not sure how they measure “capacity.” Not sure I want to know.  Also, according to the stadium’s manager the men will also have more room, “but the look won’t change
    much.”  Thank God, because we all go there for the ambiance.

  • Bleacher advertisements.  They messed with this last month, but apparently those were just mockups.

  • The rectangular, granite slabs on the sides of the outer walls are being taken down and replaced with fencing, which should let more light in.

  • The
    Sheffield Grill restaurant in the right field corner will be opened up
    for fans on game days. Previously, the grill was reserved for corporate
    events, which will be moved to Murphy’s Bleachers. Or maybe to that new area under the bleachers. I’m hearing different things here.

  • The left field bricks will be replaced. The right field bricks are cool because of the coriolis effect or centripetal force or something.  We got guys working on it.

In all seriousness, though, it’s good to see the Rickettseseses taking the Fenway Park approach.  Wrigley Field needs lots of work, but it’s worth saving. Moreover, it’s worth saving slowly, piece by piece in a well thought-out manner, rather than doing what they did to Soldier Field and just dropping some spaceship of a modern stadium on top of some of the old walls and calling it a “renovation.”

The 2005 White Sox continue to be erased


We noted yesterday that in the rush to name the Cubs the saviors of Chicago sports fans everywhere, the 2005 Chicago White Sox — and the 1959 White Sox for that matter — are being completely overlooked as World Series champs and pennant winners, respectively.

That continued last night, as first ESPN and then the Washington Post erased the Chisox out of existence in the name of pushing their Cubs-driven narrative. I mean, get a load of this graphic:

Was there no one at the world’s largest sports network — not an anchor, production assistant, researcher, intern or even a dang janitor who could tell them what was wrong with this? Guess not!

Meanwhile, the normally reliable Barry Svrluga gives the Cubs the 2004 Red Sox treatment as a group of players who will never have to buy a drink in their city again. His story is better about keeping it franchise-centric as opposed to making it a city-wide thing, but whoever is responsible for the tweet promoting the story makes a Cubs World Series a unique thing for not just Cubs fans, but Chicago as a whole:

The White Sox play in the AL Central so I assume their fans have no love at all for the Cleveland Indians. But I can’t help but think a good number of them are rooting for the Tribe simply to push back against the complete whitewashing of the White Sox.

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.