Schilling: the Sox should sign Josh Beckett now

Leave a comment

Curt Schilling, arguing that the Red Sox should sign Josh Beckett to a contract extension right now:

Here’s why, barring some freakish medical issue which I assume he
doesn’t have or there would be bigger problems, you sign Josh now. The one worry, other than health, you have when signing ANY player
to a long term contract is the player themselves. Are they going to
keep grinding, working, wanting it?

That’s where this becomes a no brainer. I know Josh as well as
anyone knows Josh. There is not a sliver of a chance that you get
anything less than his total focus, concentration and effort for every
day he’s under contract, no matter who that is with.

Schilling-the-blogger is most associated with the Red Sox. I’m guessing a good 80% or more of his readers are Sox fans.  I’m guessing a good 80% of them know that the Red Sox front office under Theo Epstein doesn’t give a diddly durn about how bad someone wants it. Dave Roberts wanted it bad and worked hard. Nomar wanted it bad and worked hard. So did Pedro. So did Jason Bay. And the front office cut the cord on those dudes because they make a point of signing guys who not only work hard, but who play well, stay healthy and who won’t cost radically more than the Red Sox think they can be expected to be worth over the course of the deal.

If Beckett wants Lackey money or better, the Sox will probably let him walk. If he’ll take something shorter or cheaper-per-year and he has a good season in 2010, he’ll stay.  It’s pretty simple really.  It doesn’t matter how hard Beckett works. It doesn’t matter how bad he wants to win.  It ain’t personal. It’s just business.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

Getty Images
Leave a comment

For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: