Did the Mets rush Fernando Martinez?

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FMart.jpgLast night, I found myself in a pretty interesting to-and-fro with Sam Page of the excellent Amazin’ Avenue about whether Fernando Martinez was rushed in his development. It was spurred on, at least initially, by what Martinez told Jesse Sanchez of MLB.com this week:

“I know I’m a big league player, and I can perform at a high level,”
Martinez said. “It’s in my hands, so I have to keep working hard and
maybe earn a spot. Maybe I make it to the big leagues with the Mets or
maybe another team, but I know I can do it. I just have to keep working
and waiting for my opportunity.”

This sounds like the simple disappointment of a competitive
young man who realizes they’d be more useful than Gary Matthews, Jr., so
it’s hard to blame him there, but I also believe it is indicative of
Martinez putting too much stock into the considerable “New York hype”
that has been thrust upon him since he signed out of the Dominican
Republic at the age of 16. After all, it’s pretty easy to do so when
people begin to call you the “Teenage Hitting Machine” on message boards and blogs without, you
know, actually seeing you physically hit a baseball.
 


Martinez, or “F-Mart” as he is so often called these days, is no longer a teenager, but he is only 21
years old. Fellow outfield prospects Desmond Jennings, Domonic Brown
and Michael Taylor are all older than him. When the Mets called him up
from Triple-A Buffalo at age 20 last May, he became the team’s
youngest position player to make their major league debut since Jose
Reyes did it at age 19 in 2003. It was an incredibly small sample size,
but he looked over-matched during two brief stints with the big club,
batting .176/.242/.275 with one home run and eight RBI in 91 at-bats
before sustaining a injury to his right knee that required
season-ending surgery.

Many believe that the Mets have made a habit of promoting him in
spite of various injuries and mixed results. A large part of my
criticism is that he needlessly started the 2007 season with Double-A
Binghamton at age of 18 with just 76 professional games under his belt,
including a .193 batting average in 119 at-bats for High-A St. Lucie.
As Page astutely pointed out in our conversation, it was Tony
Bernazard’s M.O. to challenge the most physically gifted players, so
while I can understand someone playing against more advanced competition
when warranted, I feel it became a legitimate concern with Martinez as the injuries
began to pile up.

In order to expand the conversation, below I asked a pair of
prospect gurus for their opinion on whether Martinez was “rushed” in
his development. First, we have John Sickels of the indispensable Minor
League Ball
:

Yes, I think he was rushed. The Mets made a big push to be aggressive
with Latin American players in recent years, and I think the combination of this
factor plus Martinez’s health problems slowed his development, or at least made
it more difficult to see exactly what kind of player he is. That said, he’s
still quite young and showed signs of developing his power last year in
Triple-A. He’s still a very good prospect and still very young. I pointed out in
my book this year that he was the equivalent of a college sophomore last season.
If a college sophomore was drafted and hit .290/.337/.540 in Triple-A right
away, everyone would be talking about what a wonderful prospect he is. I don’t
think the Mets have handled him too well, but it is way too soon to be down on
Martinez. People should still be excited about him.

And here we have Toby Hyde, who has followed Martinez’s progression through his website Mets Minors:

The big rush job came with his
initial assignment in 2007; rather than send the then 18-year old Martinez back
to St. Lucie, the Mets pushed him to AA Binghamton. He was ok, hitting .271/.336/.377 but injuries limited his
time. The Mets had no choice but
to return him to Binghamton in ’08. At the time of his MLB debut on May 26, 2009, he was clearly the best
choice for the Mets after crushing AAA pitching in the month of May.




There are really three moments when
the Mets rushed Martinez: his assignment to Hagerstown in 2006, and his early
August promotion to St. Lucie the same year and then his initial assignment to
Binghamton to begin 2007.  In the
last two years, the Mets have slowed Martinez down, although in part I suspect
that that has to do with the fact that there was nowhere else for him to
go. 

It’s popular to be down on Martinez right now, but I’m not so sure
that’s a bad thing. A full — and hopefully healthy — season under the radar
at Triple-A Buffalo should have him sufficiently major-league ready for
the start of 2011. We can disagree about how the Mets have handled him
up until this point, but there’s still plenty to look forward to here.

* Coincidentally, Martinez homered for Puerto Rico on Saturday afternoon in Venezuela, his second home run of Caribbean Series against Mexico.

And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Twins 14, Orioles 7: Baltimore jumped out to a 5-0 lead and led 6-2 after four but then the Twins started bashing. Actually, it wasn’t so much bashing as the ten runs they scored between the fifth and sixth innings all came without the benefit of a homer. Max Kepler and Miguel Sano did homer at other times in the game, however. Kepler drove in four. Sano and Eduardo Escobar each knocked in three. Minnesota even scored on a balk. This game had a bit of everything. Adam Jones hit a homer. It was his 125th dinger at Camden Yards, giving him the all-time lead in that park. The old record holder: Rafael Palmeiro.

Yankees 4, Royals 2: Brett Gardner, Didi Gregorius and Chris Carter all went deep as the Yankees beat Jason Vargas. Vargas had a 1.01 ERA through his first seven starts. In his last two he’s allowed nine runs on 11 hits in ten innings. Both of those games have come against the Yankees, though, so maybe it’s more them having his number than him turning into a pumpkin.

Rockies 8, Phillies 1: Top prospect Jeff Hoffman got called up for a spot start and struck out seven over seven three-hit, one-run innings. Nolan Arenado hit a two-run homer. Philly has lost 18 of 22.

Reds 5, Indians 1: The Battle for Ohio Begins. With the loss, Cleveland is in the early lead to be stuck with Ohio. OK, I kid — I’m an Ohioan, I can do that — but I don’t know for sure what the winner gets. It’s either some cup or a trophy or maybe they get to cut in line at Cedar Point or something. Anyway, Scott Feldman was sharp, allowing one run and striking out nine in six innings, and Scott Schebler homered for the third straight game. Great Scott.

Angels 3, Rays 2: J.C. Ramirez outdueled Jake Odorizzi and the Angels broke a 2-2 tie on a Jumbo Diaz wild pitch in the seventh. Five total runs scored and 12 hits between the teams over nine innings yet this game went three hours and thirty seven minutes. Eleven walks and 20 strikeouts is the likely culprit. Sounds like a slog.

Braves 5, Pirates 2: Welcome to Atlanta Matt Adams. The newest Brave hit a two-run homer in his second start since being acquired from the Cardinals and Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career homer. Center fielder Ender Inciarte had a career-high five hits for the Braves who were not fooled at all by Gerrit Cole. Meanwhile, Mike Foltynewicz and four relievers held the Buccos in check.

Giants 6, Cubs 4: Joe Panik homered to lead off the game and doubled twice. Not to lead off the game, though. It’d be impossible to do all of that in one plate appearance. Brandon Belt and Justin Ruggiano homered as well, also in their own distinct at bats. There are rules here.

Astros 1, Tigers 0: A combined one-hitter in a bullpen game. The bullpen game was necessitated by a pinched nerve in Dallas Keuchel‘s neck. Brad Peacock got the start and allowed only one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over four and a third. Chris Devenski, Will Harris and Ken Giles went the rest of the way for a combined four and two-thirds perfect innings. Michael Fulmer only made one mistake in walking George Springer to lead off the game and then giving up an RBI double to Jose Altuve. Otherwise he scattered eight hits and allowed only that one run in seven innings. That, however, was enough to lose the game.

Diamondbacks 5, White Sox 1: Zack Greinke struck out a season-high 12, allowing only one run in eight and two-thirds. Daniel Descalso hit a three-run homer in the fourth that provided all of the cushion Greinke needed.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.