Who's slower: Orlando Hudson, or the Dodgers' front office?

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The Twins and their fans are understandably giddy over the Orlando Hudson signing, but Joel Sherman of the New York Post is throwing a bit of cold water on the O-Dog today:

No doubt Hudson is a better player than Castillo and, thus, would have
helped the Mets more. But Dodgers officials were actually disappointed
in Hudson’s overall game and, remember, Joe Torre benched Hudson in favor of Ronnie Belliard late in the year. They were quickly surprised that Hudson was not
faster with a few inside the organization derisively turning his
nickname from O-Dog to Slow-Dog.

Keith Law, who worked in the Blue Jays front office when Hudson was there, thinks that to the extent Hudson’s lack of speed surprised the Dodgers, it was a failure of their own scouting, not any falloff from Hudson:

I saw Hudson a lot when we
were both in Toronto, and he was never a plus runner . . .  And from talking to
people with Arizona, I know they noticed the same phenomenon when
Hudson played there. Unfortunately, I think the cause here is that
Hudson looks the part of a speedy, low-power middle infielder, and
scouts and coaches are making assumptions that just don’t bear out in
reality. He’s not fast, he’s never been fast, and anyone who files a
report on him with a grade of 50 (average) or better for his running
speed has made a bad evaluation.

So there you have it anonymous, name-calling Dodgers officials: Orlando Hudson is rubber and you’re glue and what you say about the O-Dog bounces off him and sticks to you.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.