The Yankees: the worst case scenario Part II

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On Tuesday Andrew from NYaT imagined what it would look like if every bat in the Yankee lineup went sideways.  Yesterday he moved on to the pitchers:

CC Sabathia: What it would look like: Alex Fernandez after Marlins won the 1997 World Series. In December of 1996,
the Florida Marlins General Manager Dave Dombrowski brought a big free
agent starter to the Marlins in Alex Fernandez. In his last year in
Chicago (where he was a workhorse), Fernandez made 35 starts, pitching
258 innings, and in his first season in Florida, he pitched 220.2
innings plus the playoffs. The Marlins won their World Series but
Fernandez couldn’t handle the pressure on his arm. He missed the 1998
season, and, despite winning Comeback Player of the Year in 1999, he was out of baseball after 2000.

Andrew then proceeds to run down just how much mileage is on CC’s arm.  It’s a lot. More than I realized, actually.  I’d be more worried about it if Sabathia wasn’t freakin’ huge, however, which I suspect allows him to do things most other pitchers can’t. But like Andrew says, this is an exercise in imagining the worst, so let’s allow our imaginations to run free, shall we?

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.