UPDATE to the UPDATE: The Mariners and Bedard are now reported close to a deal

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Thumbnail image for bedard.jpgUPDATE: Now Jon Paul Morosi reports that, yes, they M’s and Bedard are close to a one year deal, though at this rate that could change five times by dinner.

And with that I’ve just about had it with the Hot Stove season.  Someone sign Johnny Damon, everyone else start playing long toss and doing wind sprints and let’s get down to some freakin’ baseball, OK?

3:18 P.M.Larry LaRue of the News-Tribune spoke with Bedard, who says no, the Mariners have not made an offer, contradicting Jim Street’s earlier reports (see below).  There is mutual interest, but at this point, nothin’s happening.

At this point I’d like to ask the question Aaron asked the other day:  If the erroneous report had come from a blogger rather than a guy with a long newspaper pedigree like Street, wouldn’t people be beefing about it?  I kinda think they would. 

9:57 A.M.: MLB.com’s Jim Street is reporting that the Mariners and Erik Bedard have reached an incentive-laden deal for 2010. Base: $1.5 million.  Bedard, as you are no doubt aware, Bedard is coming off of shoulder surgery and won’t be ready to go to start the season.  He pitched well last year before getting hurt, and assuming there are no hiccups in rehab, having him join the rotation in, say, July, would be like making a big trade or something. And this time the Mariners wouldn’t have to give up Adam Jones for him!

But before any Mariners (or Bedard fans, or Bedard’s mom) gets excited about this, it’s worth noting that Street’s report — two reports mashed into one blog post, actually — have been a bit squirrelly. Yesterday he referred to the potential deal as “rumblings in blogo-land.”  Today he says he heard it from another writer.  It’s all less concrete than even your typically mushy hot stove reports.

Blogo-land?

Yordano Ventura’s remaining contract hinges on the results of his toxicology report

DETROIT, MI - SEPTEMBER 24: Yordano Ventura #30 of the Kansas City Royals pitches against the Detroit Tigers during the first inning at Comerica Park on September 24, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)
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Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports provides an interesting window into how teams handle a player’s contract after he has died in an accident. It was reported on Sunday that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a car accident in the Dominican Republic. He had three guaranteed years at a combined $19.25 million as well as two $12 million club options with a $1 million buyout each for the 2020-21 seasons.

What happens to that money? Well, that depends on the results of a toxicology report, Rosenthal explains. If it is revealed that Ventura was driving under the influence, payment to his estate can be nullified. The Royals may still choose to pay his estate some money as a gesture of good will, but they would be under no obligation to do so. However, if Ventura’s death was accidental and not caused by his driving under the influence, then his contract remains fully guaranteed and the Royals would have to pay it towards his estate. The Royals would be reimbursed by insurance for an as yet unknown portion of that contract.

The results of the toxicology report won’t be known for another three weeks, according to Royals GM Dayton Moore. Dominican Republic authorities said that there was no alcohol found at the scene.

Ventura’s situation is different than that of Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, who died in a boating accident this past September. Fernandez was not under contract beyond 2016. He was also legally drunk and cocaine was found in his system after the accident. Still, it is unclear whether or not Fernandez was driving the boat. As a result, his estate will receive an accidental death payment of $1.05 million as well as $450,000 through the players’ standard benefits package, Rosenthal points out.

Spring training will be slightly shortened in 2018

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - MARCH 15:  General view of action between the Oakland Athletics and the San Francisco Giants during the spring training game at Scottsdale Stadium on March 15, 2014 in Scottsdale, Arizona. The A's defeated the Giants 8-1. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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The Associated Press is reporting that the spring training schedule will be shortened by two days starting in 2018. That change comes as part of the new collective bargaining agreement, which was agreed to last month.

Specifically, the voluntary reporting date for pitchers, catchers, and injured players has been changed to 43 days before the start of the regular season, down from 45. For the rest of the players, the reporting date is 38 days before the start of the regular season, down from 40.

The change goes hand-in-hand with allowing teams 187 days, rather than 183, to complete their 162-game regular season schedule.

While just about everyone seems to be in agreement that the spring training exhibition schedule is too long, team owners are likely very hesitant to shorten that part of the spring schedule because it would cost them money. So they’re just allowing players to arrive to camp a couple of days later.