Adrian Gonzalez trade talk is starting up again

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Just when the Adrian Gonzalez trade talk seemed to have died down, his agent told the San Diego Union Tribune yesterday that he expects the Padres to deal the 27-year-old first baseman:

I don’t ever want to speak for ownership because I have no knowledge of what they have and what they don’t, but the feeling we’re getting is more than likely they are going to have to trade Adrian Gonzalez because they can’t afford him.

Asked about Gonzalez’s chances of remaining in San Diego long term, team CEO Jeff Moorad had a similarly pessimistic response:

While I’d be thrilled to have him part of the organization for the long term, the early signals indicate his cost will be greater than our ability to pay.

The combination of those quotes seemingly makes it all but certain that Gonzalez will be traded, but here’s the thing: San Diego still has him under contract for two more seasons at a combined cost of just $10.25 million. Controlling him cheaply for 2010 and 2011 obviously gives Gonzalez a lot more trade value, but it also means the Padres could try to rebuild around him and address the contract issue when he’s actually, you know, somewhat close to becoming a free agent.
Acting like he’s a goner two full seasons before his contract ends mostly just seems like a great way to piss off your entire fan base. Gonzalez can become a free agent after 2011, but so can Ryan Howard, Prince Fielder, Carlos Beltran, Jonathan Papelbon, Mark Buehrle, J.D. Drew, and a couple dozen other prominent players. You know why there aren’t articles every week with quotes about how those guys are all goners? Because for the most part their teams realize that two years is a long time.
A lot can change between now and 2012. Gonzalez could get hurt or simply decline from his current superstar level. Or maybe the Padres could even improve and start making more money. If they want to trade Gonzalez in an effort to rebuild that’s one thing, but acting like they’re being forced to make a decision two years ahead of time–and constantly letting their fans read all about it in the newspaper–is just silly.

Mets beat Phillies to clinch wild card tie

PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 30: Jose Reyes #7 and Curtis Granderson #3 of the New York Mets celebrate their win against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on September 30, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Mets defeated the Phillies 5-1. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)
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The magic number to clinch a wild card spot is still 1, but the Mets have at least secured a wild card tie after defeating the Phillies 5-1 on Friday night.

Jay Bruce powered the offensive drive, going 3-for-4 with a pair of RBI singles and his 33rd home run of the season, ripped from an Alec Asher fastball in the seventh inning. On the mound, right-hander Robert Gsellman limited the Phillies to seven hits and one run over six frames, striking out seven batters in his eighth appearance of the year. Behind him, a cadre of Mets relievers turned out three scoreless innings to preserve the lead and anchor the Mets in the wild card standings.

The Cardinals aren’t out of the race quite yet, and can still force a tiebreaker with the Mets if they manage to win the remainder of their games this weekend and the Mets lose the rest of theirs. Any other scenario will ensure the Mets’ exclusive rights to a wild card spot next week. While a wild card clinch is unlikely to happen tonight, with St. Louis leading Pittsburgh 7-0 through 7.5 innings and just entering a rain delay, it remains a distinct possibility over these next two days.

Carlos Rodon strikes out 10 consecutive batters

CHICAGO, IL - SEPTEMBER 30: Carlos Rodon #55 of the Chicago White Sox pitches against the Minnesota Twins during the first inning on September 30, 2016 at U. S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)
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In a season that boasts the likes of Max Scherzer (he of the 20-strikeout masterpiece) and Clayton Kershaw (he of nine separate games with at least 10 strikeouts), there hasn’t been anyone who’s done exactly what Carlos Rodon did this week.

During Friday’s series opener against the Twins, Rodon retired seven consecutive batters via strikeout. His streak — and the beginnings of a perfect game, if you can call it that after just 2 ⅓ frames — ended on a Logan Schafer double that found right field well before Rodon managed to put up two strikes. With seven consecutive strikeouts, Rodon became the first American League pitcher to strike out seven batters to start a game since right-hander Joe Cowley did it for the Sox back in 1986. Had Schafer whiffed on a couple more fastballs, Rodon would have tied Mets’ starter Jacob deGrom for most strikeouts to start a game in major league history.

Not only did Rodon manage to quell the first seven batters in Minnesota’s lineup, but he extended his strikeout streak to 10 consecutive batters dating back through his last start against the Cleveland Indians. Per MLB.com’s Rhett Bollinger, the last major league pitcher to do so was reliever Eric Gagne, who accomplished the feat for the 2003 Dodgers during his first and only Cy Young Award-winning season.

Any way you slice it, this is an impressive look: