Ruben Amaro: "I'm not a Dummy"

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Despite pulling off the Halladay trade and extension, Phillies General Manager Ruben Amaro has continued to get flak for not keeping Cliff Lee too and shooting for the moon in 2010.  He responded yesterday:

“I was talking to some people the other day,” Amaro recalled, “and I
said, ‘I’m not a dummy. I know what Cliff Lee means to our rotation in
addition to Halladay and [Cole] Hamels. It’s a no-brainer.’ … Our goal is to be a contender every year — not
just to be a competitor, but to be a contender every year. That’s
really my job. As an executive of the club, it’s my job to do what I
can to try to maintain that level of talent on the club and that hope
from the fans. So, yes, I’d like to have a championship, but not at the
cost of having our organization not be good for 10 years.

I’ve wondered about decision to trade Lee too, but I’m not going to go crazy over it. The Phillies should still be favored to win the division this year, and there’s no real reason to believe that they’d have the resources to sign Cliff Lee beyond 2010 after locking up Halladay. They did what they did, it’s not the worst move anyone has made this winter, and life will go on without Cliff Lee.

Still, I’m not quite sure that Amaro’s reasoning here is all that compelling.  Sure, no one wants to have their team “not be good for 10 years,” but is the haul they got for Lee — Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and Juan Ramirez — the sort of thing that prevents that?  As Matthew noted at the time of the trade, the Phillies, like the Mariners, likely view Aumont as a relief prospect.  Ramirez has potential, but he got beat up a bit last year and is still a work in progress.  Gillies had nice numbers last year in strong hitting environments, but probably projects to be a fourth outfielder.

Like I said, Amaro has a ring and has made some good moves, so he’s entitled to some benefit of the doubt. But ask yourself: is a relief prospect, a raw starter and a potential fourth outfielder the kind of thing that keeps a team competitive for a decade?  Put differently, are they worth a season of a stone-cold killer of a rotation plus a first round pick once Lee leaves via free agency?

I kind of don’t think so.

Report: Brewers sign Yovani Gallardo to a major league deal

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Free agent right-hander Yovani Gallardo is headed back to the Brewers on a major league deal, The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports. No other terms have been reported yet, as the agreement is still pending a physical.

Gallardo, 31, completed a one-year run with the Mariners before getting his $13 million option declined by the team last month. He provided little value during his time in Seattle, pitching to a 5-10 record in 22 starts and putting up a 5.72 ERA, 4.1 BB/9 and 6.5 SO/9 in 130 2/3 innings as both a starter and reliever.

Still, assuming the veteran righty is on the cusp of a comeback, he may as well try for it with his original club. Gallardo last appeared for the Brewers from 2007 to 2014, racking up a cumulative 20.8 fWAR and peaking during the 2010 season, when he earned his first All-Star nomination and Silver Slugger award. This will be his ninth career season with the club.

Even with Gallardo aboard, the Brewers are expected to continue deepening their pitching stores for 2018. With team ace Jimmy Nelson still recovering from shoulder surgery, the club will enter the season with a projected rotation of Gallardo, Zach Davies, Chase Anderson and Junior Guerra, the latter of whom pitched just 70 1/3 innings in 2017 following a right calf strain and shin contusion. Another big name pitcher could help cement Milwaukee’s rotation and keep them competitive for another year, though they don’t appear to have made any concrete moves in that direction so far.