Bloomberg introduces fantasy baseball product

Leave a comment

Bloomberg Sports rolled out a demo of their new fantasy baseball product in New York this afternoon. Through a partnership with MLB Advanced Media, the goal is to lure fantasy players away from competitors like Yahoo! and ESPN. While it will surely appeal to the already fantasy-savvy, the new portal through MLB.com signifies an effort to mainstream fantasy baseball in a way that can increase interest in the sport, similar to what fantasy football has done to the NFL.

It’s a nice start, but I’ve always believed that there is a ceiling to how successful a fantasy baseball model can be, at least in comparison to the NFL. The reason fantasy football has become the behemoth it is today is because its schedule requires less of a time commitment on behalf of the average person, while baseball involves a rigorous day-to-day schedule. This reflects in the insane television ratings and sales of NFL Ticket, as the average fantasy player has a stake in every regular season game, while in baseball, they do not. That said, I’ll root for anything that improves the quality of analysis and evaluation and growth of the game and fantasy baseball. Having great minds like Jonah Keri on board will certainly help towards that end.

Anyhow, while you’ll have to wait until February 18 to use Bloomberg’s draft kit, you can purchase Rotoworld’s Draft Guide right now, with special appearances by me scattered throughout! You’ll get analysis, projections, and profiles for over 1,000 players, as well as articles covering prospects, keeper-league strategies, mock
drafts, sleepers and busts. There are customizable, printable cheat
sheets, updated depth charts for
all teams and ADP projections. Basically anything and everything you need to be prepared for your fantasy draft, constantly updated throughout Spring Training. Let those guys stick to stocks and bonds, we got this fantasy baseball thing covered.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

Abbie Parr/Getty Images
3 Comments

Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.