Scott Boras tries to spin the Damon situation. And fails.

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In the wake of the Yankees doing the moonwalk from Johnny Damon and signing Randy Winn, Scott Boras is trying to spin, but he’s doing a bad job of it.  First Boras:

“The Yankees never even made an offer to me regarding Johnny Damon
during the entire process, and the reason for that is they had
budgetary constraints.”

Um, Scott, that’s not what your client said last month:

Damon said in a text message Friday that the Yankees had offered two
years and $14 million, while he had offered to return for two years and
$20 million. That was true, a Yankees official confirmed.

Confronted with that inconsistency, Boras says “that it was not an offer, because the Yankees told him they needed to hear from Johnson first.”

Which smells like high-grade horse manure.  I mean, really, why on Earth would the Yankees make a non-offer, or whatever Boras wants to call it, to Damon while they were still waiting to hear from Johnson?  Damon thinks it was an offer. The Yankees think it was an offer. The only one who doesn’t think it was an offer is Boras, who right now is the one running for cover.

My suspicion is that what really happened was that (1) the Yankees offered Damon $14 million; (2) Boras rejected it and (3) the Yankees moved on to Nick Johnson, possibly telling Boras that they’d talk again if Johnson got away, but by no means holding some contingent whatever-it-was open in the interim.  This seems to be borne out by Brian Cashman’s account: “On Dec. 17, Scott’s exact words were that he would not take a penny
less than $13 million a year for two years. We believed
him.”  Nick Johnson signed on December 18th.

Rosenthal read today’s Times story and sums it up pretty succinctly: “There is simply no excuse for a player of this quality to be in such a compromised position.”  I agree. That player was compromised by an agent’s spectacular failure to understand his client’s market.  

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.