The Mets are a mess

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Unless something really ridiculous happens today I’m going to do my best to honor Bob’s voluntary cease fire on the Mets for as long as a I can. But that doesn’t mean that I can’t outsource the mocking.  Here’s Bob Klapisch:

None of this is good news for the Mets’ fans, who are wondering
what, exactly, Minaya has done to improve the team this winter. The
signing of Jason Bay has been virtually negated by the GM’s inertia . . . Unless Smoltz changes his mind, the Mets likely will begin the
season with journeyman Fernando Nieve as their No. 5 starter. He lines
up behind Perez, John Maine and Mike Pelfrey, all of whom will come to
camp with health issues and emotional baggage.

The gap between the Mets and Phillies has never been wider than it
is today. So unless Santana can pitch three times a week, Jerry Manuel
will have to rely on tightly crossed fingers to keep his job beyond
June 1.

Why are things so dire? According to Rosenthal it’s all about the process, or lack thereof, employed by the front office:

The Mets, multiple industry sources say, do not function like most
clubs. Their unique style would be fine if they were building
championship teams. Instead, they’re coming off a 70-win season and losing out on free agent after free agent–except for one, left fielder Jason Bay, who seemingly lacked a better option.

Ownership, rather than giving Minaya a set budget, weighs the
finances of each acquisition separately, forcing the team to run down
its priority list one move at a time. The paint-by-numbers approach,
which inhibits multitasking and creativity, would work against any GM.

In other words, despite Omar Minaya’s manifest shortcomings, he’s not the one most responsible for this mess. It’s ownership. And if the Wilpons can’t be taken down by a financial collapse and the biggest Ponzi scheme in history, nothin’ is going to take them down.

Hmmm. I guess this post didn’t honor the spirit of the cease fire.  I’ll try harder to be nicer to them tomorrow.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.