Keith Law ranks the farm systems

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After Jane Austen and Alton Brown’s birthdays, today and tomorrow are the two biggest days in all of Keith Lawdom.  Tomorrow it’s his top 100 prospects. Today: ranking the farm systems.  The features are for ESPN Insider members only, but in all honesty, these are two of the features that make getting an Insider subscription worthwhile. If you care a lick about player development, you’ll be going back to them over and over.

Anyway, the systems:  Texas leads the pack for the second year in a row. Frankly, seeing them so high again makes me feel a bit better, as I harbored a secret fear that last year’s top ranking was totally attributable to Frank Wren overpaying for Mark Teixeira a couple of years ago.

Other notables: Boston is second, my Braves are fifth, with Law giving me happy feelings about a potential shutdown rotation come, oh, 2013 or so.  The Cubs are seventh. The Royals are ninth, which pleasantly surprised me because I still remember a time when the Royals were considered the class organization in the American League, and though I don’t root for them, I liked the world back then.

The Mets are at 15, which may be as close to the middle of the pack they get in any category this year.  The Dodgers are at 19. The Yankees are at 25, but it’s not like they depend on the farm system all that much. And heck, if they’re unhappy with their rating maybe they can just buy Law himself and find themselves much higher next year.  The Cardinals and White Sox come in at 29th and 30th, respectively.

As is always the case with these sorts of lists, the comments are more useful than the rankings themselves, so if you are able, I recommend giving the piece a read.

Jeff Wilpon reminds Mets fans that insuring David Wright “is not cheap”

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It’s can’t be easy being a Mets fan. Your team plays in the biggest city in America and should, theoretically, have big payrolls and always be in contention. They aren’t, however, partially because of horrendous luck and ill-timed injuries, partially because of poor baseball decisions and partially because the team’s ownership got taken down by a Ponzi scheme that, one would think anyway, sophisticated businessmen would recognize as a Ponzi scheme. We’ll leave that go, though.

What Mets fans are left with are (a) occasional windows of contention, such as we saw in 2014-16; (b) times of frustrating austerity on the part of ownership when, one would hope anyway, some money would be spent; (c) an inordinate focus on tabloidy and scandalous nonsense which just always seems to surround the club; and (c) a lot of disappointment.

You can file this latest bit under any of or many of the above categories, but it is uniquely Mets.

Team president Jeff Wilpon spoke to the press this afternoon about team payroll. In talking about payroll, David Wright‘s salary was included despite the fact that he may never play again and despite the fact that insurance is picking up most of the tab. Wilpon’s comment:

I’m guessing every team has a line item, someplace, about the costs of insurance. They’re businesses after all, and all businesses have to deal with that. They do not talk about it as a barrier to spending more money on players to the press, however, as they likely know that fans want to be told a story of hope and baseball-driven decisions heading into a new season and do not want to hear about all of the reasons the club will not spend any money despite sitting in a huge market.

This doesn’t change a thing about what the Mets were going to do or not do, but it does have the added bonus of making Mets fans roll their eyes and ask themselves what they did to deserve these owners. And that, more than almost anything, is the essence of Mets fandom these days.