Could Buster Posey be the next Craig Biggio?

Leave a comment

The San Francisco Chronicle’s Bruce Jenkins freely admits that it’s bar talk, not news, but it’s bar talk season so let’s hear him, um, talk:

Off-the-wall thoughts bouncing around the 3-Dot Lounge: What if Buster Posey is an infielder, in essence, and not a catcher? And what if he’s
hitting .438 with 15 homers in Fresno around the first of June? . . . As catchers go, Posey is slightly built. It seems almost criminal to
shorten his career – or at the very least, torment his legs – by
keeping him behind the plate exclusively. He’s a born hitter, and he
was an infielder until making the switch to catcher at Florida State.
He could play an acceptable shortstop at any level, he’d be absolutely
fine at third base, and a no-brainer at first.

I like “what-if” scenarios, and as I sit here right now I like to think what life would be like if Buster Posey was, say, a catcher-turned second baseman like Craig Biggio.  But I’m not sure Biggio was ever considered as good a defensive catcher as Posey is purported to be.* I haven’t had a chance to see him catch, but  according to Keith Law’s prospect rating last year, Posey “is a plus defensive catcher with a plus arm” and those don’t show up on your doorstep every day, especially with a good batting eye and mid-range or better power.

In an ideal world, Posey is given a chance to start behind the dish — a chance even Biggio got, by the way.  Of course, the current San Francisco Giants’ decision makers don’t live in an ideal world. They live in a land where Bengie Molina is given the starting catching job until his having full time employment puts his Social Security benefits at risk.

*Biggio’s conversion has been officially chronicled by history as “the Astros wanted to save his legs.”  I don’t know if that’s really true or not, as I can’t find a reference to Biggio’s time behind the plate that doesn’t treat the conversion like some super hero origin myth.  Maybe he just wasn’t that good back there? Anyone who watched him more closely as a catcher back in the day care to weigh in?

Mike Trout has a torn thumb ligament, could require surgery

G
14 Comments

Yesterday Mike Trout left the Marlins-Angels game after hurting his thumb while sliding head first into second base. After the game the Angels talked about it as if it were just a sprain. Trout had an MRI today, however, and the diagnosis is far worse: he has a torn thumb ligament.

While a treatment option has not yet been chosen, surgery is a possibility. A certainty is that he’ll miss, at the very least, several weeks of play. He has been placed on the disabled list for the first time in his career.

Trout, the reigning AL MVP and, without question, the best player in baseball, is batting .337/.461/.742 with 16 home runs, 36 RBI, 36 runs scored, and 10 stolen bases in 206 plate appearances this season. Even with the one of the weaker supporting casts in baseball, Trout had the Angels near .500 and in at least arguable contention in the AL West.

Without him, they are likely sunk. Without him, baseball is worse off.

Basebrawl! Harper, Strickland punch away, Nats-Giants fight

Getty Images
55 Comments

SAN FRANCISCO — Nationals slugger Bryce Harper and San Francisco reliever Hunter Strickland both landed punches to the head during a wild brawl that erupted Monday after a hit by pitch.

Harper was hit in the right hip by Strickland’s 98 mph fastball in the eighth inning with Washington ahead 2-0.

Harper pointed the bat toward Strickland, charged the mound and fired his batting helmet wide of the pitcher. They started to swing away and they each connected as the benches and bullpens emptied.

At least two Giants players forcefully dragged Strickland from the middle of the brawl all the way into the dugout. Harper and Strickland were both ejected.

In the 2014 NL Division Series, Harper hit two home runs off Strickland. After the star’s second shot, in Game 4, he stared at Strickland as he rounded the bases.