Twins have 'real interest' in Jim Thome

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Joe Christensen of the Minneapolis Star Tribune did some investigating after a rumor began circulating out of Chicago that Jim Thome is close to signing with the Twins and much to my surprise he found that … well, there’s actually some truth behind it:

I called a Twins official, expecting to hear that this is totally far-fetched, and turns out they do have real interest in Thome and haven’t ruled out their chances of signing him. Probably not today, mind you, but it’s getting late in the offseason and the prices for free agents are falling fast. The Twins are bargain hunting, and if Thome were to accept a bench role at a severely reduced price–he made $13 million last year–there could be a match.

Just yesterday I wrote about how Thome remained a very productive, useful player despite seemingly getting almost no interest as a free agent, so the Twins are smart to pursue him. With that said, it’s tough to see a real fit for Thome in Minnesota, because the Twins already have Jason Kubel as a left-handed designated hitter and for better or worse (mostly worse) seem committed to playing Delmon Young every day in left field.
Now, moving Kubel to left field, sending Young to the bench, and installing Thome as the primary DH would be a massive upgrade to the lineup, but I’d be surprised if the Twins were actually considering that option. Thome can’t hit lefties or play defense at this point, but he hit .262/.383/.498 against right-handers last season. That works out to an .881 OPS versus righties, which would have ranked fourth on the Twins sandwiched between Justin Morneau at .906 and Michael Cuddyer at .803. He can still mash.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.