Rangers take $5 million gamble on Colby Lewis' return from Japan

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Colby Lewis was one of the game’s best pitching prospects while coming up through the Rangers’ farm system, with Baseball America ranking him as their No. 32 overall prospect in 2003, sandwiched between Adrian Gonzalez at 31 and Josh Hamilton at 33.
That season he made 26 starts for the Rangers as a 23-year-old rookie, posting a hideous 7.30 ERA while opponents batted .317 with a .952 OPS in 127 innings. Shoulder surgery followed in early 2004 and Lewis didn’t return to the majors for 27 months. Over the next two seasons he was let go by the Rangers, Tigers, Nationals, A’s, and Royals while posting a 6.20 ERA in 40.2 innings as a reliever. And then that was it.
Lewis headed for Japan, but after back-to-back dominant (and healthy) seasons for the Hiroshima Carp he returned to the United States last month and has re-signed with the Rangers. Lewis inked a two-year, $5 million deal with a $3.25 million team option for 2012, and yesterday Texas general manager Jon Daniels made it clear that he’s guaranteed a spot in the rotation going into spring training:

We expect Colby to be one of five in our Opening Day rotation. This was not the development program we had in mind. It may be a little different path, but he has had a lot of success and a lot of experiences that make us feel that Colby will be a strong addition to our staff.

Lewis has the seventh-worst ERA in baseball history among pitchers with at least 200 career innings, but the former first-round pick is still just 30 years old and went 26-17 with a 2.82 ERA and exceptional 369/46 K/BB ratio over 354 innings in Japan. Had a Japanese-born pitcher posted those same numbers he’d have little trouble finding a deal for more than $5 million. For example, Kenshin Kawakami got $23 million from the Braves last offseason and Hiroki Kuroda signed with the Dodgers for $35 million two winters ago.
MLB.com’s T.R. Sullivan notes that the Yankees, Twins, A’s, and Pirates were also interested in Lewis, but his familiarity with the Rangers and a guaranteed spot in the rotation no doubt led to a Texas return. Perhaps he’ll struggle again, but if you view Lewis as simply a pitcher who performed extremely well in Japan for two years rather than a former prospect bust it certainly makes sense for the Rangers to take a $5 million risk.

New Jersey woman files suit against the Brewers after being struck by a batting practice foul ball

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - APRIL 11: New protective netting now protects lower deck fans from dugout to dugout at Citizens Bank Park before an opening day game between the San Diego Padres and Philadelphia Phillies on April 11, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
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A woman from Camden County in New Jersey has filed suit against the Milwaukee Brewers after being struck by a foul ball during batting practice two years ago at Miller Park, Jeff Goldman of NJ.com reports. According to her lawsuit, she suffered an orbital fracture to her left eye socket, nerve and iris damage, and a concussion.

The woman, Dana Morelli, was in the second row behind third base along with her fiancee and his son when she was struck by the foul ball. She had to remain in a dark room in Milwaukee before being able to safely travel home. (Sensitivity to light is a common symptom of a concussion.)

Fan safety has become a hot button topic recently. This past December, Major League Baseball issued safety recommendations but ultimately left it up to each ballpark to decide by how much to extend the netting.

Earlier this month, Phillies infielder Freddy Galvis fouled off a pitch that struck a fan. After the game, he clamored for the Phillies to increase protective netting at Citizens Bank Park to extend to the seats behind the dugout, where the fan was hit. Another fan was hit the next day and Galvis threw up his hands in frustration. While fans and owners seem to mostly be against netting, the players seem to be for it.

Mike Leake placed on the disabled list with shingles

Mike Leake
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The Cardinals have placed starter Mike Leake on the 15-day disabled list, retroactive to August 22, with shingles. Which: ugh. Anyone I’ve ever known who has had it wouldn’t wish it on their worst enemy.

Leake was diagnosed with the virus last week and had to be scratched from his scheduled start Saturday versus the Athletics. There is no timetable for Leake’s return. Leake is 9-9 with a 4.56 ERA in 25 starts for the Cardinals. Poor dude.