Diving into the depths: Milwaukee Brewers

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This is part of a 30-article series looking at each team’s depth chart headed into spring training.
Milwaukee Brewers
1. Randy Wolf
2. Yovani Gallardo
3. Doug Davis
4. Manny Parra
5. Jeff Suppan
6. Dave Bush
7. Chris Capuano
8. John Halama
9. Kameron Loe
10. Carlos Villanueva
11. Chris Narveson
12. A.J. Murray
13. Josh Butler
Wednesday’s addition of Davis complicates things, but it was necessary. Now the Brewers will have Parra, Suppan and Bush compete for two spots. Manager Ken Macha said months ago that Parra was penciled into the rotation, while the other two weren’t necessarily. If salary plays a role, then Parra might be out of luck. However, my guess here is that either Suppan or Bush will be released in spring training. It’d mean eating $12 million in Suppan’s case, but Bush, who is due about $4.25 million in arbitration, won’t have a guaranteed contract.
1. Trevor Hoffman
2. LaTroy Hawkins
3. Todd Coffey
4. Mitch Stetter
5. Carlos Villanueva
6. Claudio Vargas
7. Kameron Loe
8. Chuck Lofgren
9. John Halama
10. Tim Dillard
11. John Axford
12. Chris Smith
13. Mike Burns
14. Chris Narverson
15. Josh Butler
The bullpen is six deep with quality arms. With Villanueva and Vargas able to go multiple innings, the Brewers may opt to keep Lofgren, a Rule 5 pick, as a second lefty specialist.

1. Gregg Zaun
2. George Kottaras
3. Jonathan Lucroy
4. Matt Treanor
5. Angel Salome
First base
1. Prince Fielder
2. Casey McGehee
3. Adam Heether
Second base
1. Rickie Weeks
2. Craig Counsell
3. Hernan Iribarren
4. Luis Cruz
Third base
1. Casey McGehee
2. Mat Gamel
3. Craig Counsell
1. Alcides Escobar
2. Craig Counsell
3. Luis Cruz
The only question left with regards to the starting lineup is whether Lucroy can win some sort of job-sharing arrangement with Zaun. The Brewers won’t keep the 23-year-old as a true backup, so if Zaun is going to be the starter, then Lucroy would head to Triple-A and Kottaras would likely stick over Treanor.
Gamel seems set to return to Triple-A, even though his showing in 128 at-bats for the Brewers last season suggested that he was ready for the majors. He’ll be available if McGehee stumbles as a sophomore.
Left field
1. Ryan Braun
2. Jody Gerut
3. Trent Oeltjen
4. Adam Stern
Center field
1. Carlos Gomez
2. Jody Gerut
3. Lorenzo Cain
4. Adam Stern
Right field
1. Corey Hart
2. Jody Gerut
3. Lorenzo Cain
4. Trent Oeltjen
The Brewers will probably pick up a fifth outfielder from the bargain rack as we get closer to spring training. Ideally, it’d be a right-handed hitter capable of providing a little punch off the bench. Marcus Thames will probably be out of their price range, but Reed Johnson or Rocco Baldelli could work.

Diamondbacks fire pitching coach Mike Harkey

Oliver Perez, Mike Harkey
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Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic reports that the Diamondbacks have fired pitching coach Mike Harkey following a season in which the staff ranked ninth among NL teams in runs allowed.

That actually represents a big improvement from last season, when the Diamondbacks allowed the second-most runs in the league in Harkey’s first year as pitching coach, but the Tony La Russa-led front office has decided to make a change.

Prior to joining the Diamondbacks two offseasons ago Harkey served as the Yankees’ bullpen coach from 2008-2013. He pitched eight seasons in the majors.

Nats expected to consider Cal Ripken for the manager job

Cal Ripken Jr

FOX Sports’ Jon Morosi reports that the Nationals are expected to consider Cal Ripken Jr. for their managerial vacancy. Ripken, of course, was recently reported to have been considered by the club the last time the job was open.

This could be a courtesy. And if you’re a Nats fan, you have to hope it is, right? Because the single biggest argument in favor of Matt Williams when he was hired was that he was a top player in his day, wasn’t too far removed from his playing career and could be a good clubhouse guy who understood what made major leaguers tick. His lack of experience was brushed off. All of which would be the same thing for Ripken, except he doesn’t even have the coaching experience Williams had and is even farther removed from his playing days.

I know he’s famous and everything, but if the Nationals’ 2015 season is evidence of anything, perhaps it should be evidence that sometimes it’s useful to have a manager who has actually, you know, made a pitching change once in his professional life.